Moyorodake [Medvezhia]

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  • 45.389°N
  • 148.838°E

  • 1124 m
    3687 ft

  • 290100
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9 January-15 January 2013

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly was detected over Kudriavy, a stratovolcano of the Medvezhia volcanic complex, on 11 January. Strong steam-and-gas plumes were also observed.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)



 Available Weekly Reports


2013: January


9 January-15 January 2013

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly was detected over Kudriavy, a stratovolcano of the Medvezhia volcanic complex, on 11 January. Strong steam-and-gas plumes were also observed.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1999 Oct 7 1999 Oct 13 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Kudriavy
1958 Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Kudriavy
[ 1946 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2   Kudriavy
1883 May 1883 Jun Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Kudriavy
1778 Dec 31 ± 365 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Kudriavy
0050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Botcharnikov R E, Shmulovich K I, Tkachenko S I, Korzhinsky M A, Rybin A V, 2003. Hydrogen isotope geochemistry and heat balance of a fumarolic system: Kudriavy volcano, Kuriles. J Volc Geotherm Res, 124: 45-66.

Ermakov V A, Steinberg G S, 1999. Kudryavyi volcano and the evolution of Medveshiya caldera (Iturup I., Kuril Is.). Volc Seism, 21: 307-338 (English translation).

Gorshkov G S, 1958. Kurile Islands. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 7: 1-99.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Vlasov G M, 1967. Kamchatka, Kuril, and Komandorskiye Islands: geological description. In: {Geol of the USSR}, Moscow, 31: 1-827.

The Moyorodake volcanic complex (also known as Medvezhia) occupies the NE end of Iturup (Etorofu) Island. Two overlapping calderas, 14 x 18 and 10 x 12 km in diameter, were formed during the Pleistocene. The caldera floor contains several lava domes, cinder cones and associated lava fields, and a small lake. Four small closely spaced stratovolcanoes were constructed along an E-W line on the eastern side of the complex. The easternmost and highest, Medvezhii, lies outside the western caldera, along the Pacific coast. Srednii, Tukap, and Kudriavy (Moyorodake) volcanoes lie immediately to the west. Historically active Moyorodake is younger than 2000 years; it and Tukap remain fumarolically active. The westernmost of the post-caldera cones, Menshoi Brat, is a large lava dome with flank scoria cones, one of which has produced a series of young lava flows up to 4.5 km long that reached Slavnoe Lake. Eruptions of Moyorodake have been documented since the 18th century, although lava flows from cinder cones on the flanks of Menshoi Brat were also probably erupted within the past few centuries.