Chachadake [Tiatia]

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  • Japan - administered by Russia
  • Kuril Islands
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1981 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 44.353°N
  • 146.252°E

  • 1822 m
    5976 ft

  • 290030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

29 August-4 September 2012

SVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly over Tiatia was detected in satellite images on 1 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)



 Available Weekly Reports


2012: August
2010: February | June


29 August-4 September 2012

SVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly over Tiatia was detected in satellite images on 1 September. The Aviation Color Code remained at Yellow.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


30 June-6 July 2010

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly from Tiatia volcano was detected by satellite on 25 June.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


16 June-22 June 2010

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly from Tiatia, a volcano on NE Kunashir Island, was detected by satellite on 19 June. Tiatia does not have a seismic network; satellite image observations are the primary tool for monitoring many of the Kuril Islands volcanoes.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


9 June-15 June 2010

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly from Tiatia was detected by satellite on 10 June. Tiatia does not have a seismic network; satellite image observations are the primary tool for monitoring many of the Kurile Islands volcanoes.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


2 June-8 June 2010

SVERT reported that a thermal anomaly from Tiatia was detected by satellite on 31 May. Tiatia does not have a seismic network; satellite image observations are the primary tool for monitoring many of the Kurile Islands volcanoes.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


10 February-16 February 2010

SVERT reported that a weak thermal anomaly from Tiatia was detected by satellite on 9 February.

Source: Sakhalin Volcanic Eruption Response Team (SVERT)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1982 Feb 10 ] [ 1982 Feb 14 ] Uncertain 1  
1981 Jun 10 1981 Jun 25 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1978 Jul 20 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1974 ] [ 1975 ] Discredited    
1973 Jul 14 1973 Jul 28 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations NNW and SSE flanks
1812 Aug Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Gorshkov G S, 1958. Kurile Islands. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 7: 1-99.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

Green J, Short N M, 1971. Volcanic Landforms and Surface Features: a Photographic Atlas and Glossary. New York: Springer-Verlag, 519 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Murayama I, 1987. Volcanoes of Japan (I). Tokyo: Daimedo, 315 p (2nd edition, in Japanese).

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Ono K, Soya T, Mimura K, 1981. Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan Map Ser, no 11, 2nd edition, 1:2,000,000.

Chachadake, also known as Tiatia, consists of a beautifully symmetrical cone that rises above the broad rim of an erosionally furrowed, 2.1 x 2.4 km wide caldera. The edifice occupies the NE tip of Kunashir Island and morphologically resembles Mount Vesuvius. The pristine-looking conical central cone, mostly formed by basaltic to basaltic-andesite strombolian eruptions, rises 400 m above the floor of the caldera and contains a 400 x 250 m wide crater with two explosion vents separated by a linear septum. Fresh lava flows cover much of the SW caldera floor and have overflowed the rim, extending to the foot of the older somma, which formed during the late Pleistocene or early Holocene. A lava flow from a flank cone on the northern caldera rim reached the Sea of Okhotsk. A major explosive eruption in 1973 followed an initial historical eruption in 1812.