Ruruidake [Smirnov]

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Japan - administered by Russia
  • Kuril Islands
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 44.454°N
  • 146.139°E

  • 1486 m
    4874 ft

  • 290021
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Ruruidake [Smirnov].



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Ruruidake [Smirnov].

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Ruruidake [Smirnov]. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Gorshkov G S, 1970. Volcanism and the Upper Mantle; Investigations in the Kurile Island Arc. New York: Plenum Publishing Corp, 385 p.

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Ono K, Soya T, Mimura K, 1981. Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan Map Ser, no 11, 2nd edition, 1:2,000,000.

Ruruidake is a late-Pleistocene andesitic-to-dacitic volcano NW of Tiatia volcano at the NW tip of Kunashir Island in the southern Kuriles. On the S flank is the Smirnov stratovolcano, a gently sloping 1189-m-high structure that in part retains a constructional form, but the southern side has been heavily eroded by glaciers, exposing its Tertiary basement. A wide glacial trough on the SE flank of Smirnov contains a pyroclastic cone at its head that fed a 4-km-long lava flow. Another pyroclastic cone is located at the base of the trough near the terminus of the lava flow. Two fresh-looking lava domes of Holocene age also lie within the glacial valley to the north.