NW Rota-1

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.601°N
  • 144.775°E

  • -517 m
    -1696 ft

  • 284211
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

15 April-21 April 2009

According to a news article from 20 April, scientists investigating NW Rota-1 during the previous two weeks observed the volcano erupting about 520 m below the ocean's surface. Measurements indicated that the volcano had grown about 40 m since 2006. One scientist observed billowing yellow and white sulfur clouds, carbon dioxide bubbles streaming out of the vent, and "ash and pebble-sized rocks raining out of the plume."

Source: GuamPDN - Pacific Daily News



 Available Weekly Reports


2009: April


15 April-21 April 2009

According to a news article from 20 April, scientists investigating NW Rota-1 during the previous two weeks observed the volcano erupting about 520 m below the ocean's surface. Measurements indicated that the volcano had grown about 40 m since 2006. One scientist observed billowing yellow and white sulfur clouds, carbon dioxide bubbles streaming out of the vent, and "ash and pebble-sized rocks raining out of the plume."

Source: GuamPDN - Pacific Daily News


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2003 (?) 2010 Mar (in or after) Confirmed 0 Historical Observations Upper South flank (Brimstone Pit)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Chadwick W W Jr, Cashman K V, Embley R, Matsumoto H, Dziak R P, de Ronde C E J, Lau T A, Deardorff N D, Merle S M, 2008. Direct video and hydrophone observations of submarine explosive eruptions at NW Rota-1 volcano, Mariana Arc. J Geophys Res, doi:10.1029/2007JB005215.

Embley R W, Baker E T, Chadwick W W Jr, Lupton J E, Resing J A, Massoth G J, Nakamura K, 2004. Explorations of Mariana Arc volcanoes reveal new hydrothermal systems. Eos, Trans Amer Geophys Union, 85: 37 and 40.

Embley R W, Chadwick W W Jr, Baker E T, Butterfield D A, Resing J A, de Ronde C E J, Tunnicliffe V, Lupton J E, Juniper S K, Rubin K H, Stern R J, Lebon G T, Nakamura K, Merle S G, Hein J R, Wiens D A, Tamura Y, 2006. Long-term eruptive activity at a submarine arc volcano. Nature, 441: 494-497.

NOAA Vents Program, 2004. Submarine ring of fire 2004, Mariana arc submarine volcanoes, R/V Thomas G. Thompson Cruise TN167, March 27 - April 17. NOAA Vents Program final cruise report (http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/04fire/logs/summary/media/marianas2004cruisereport.pdf).

Smithsonian Institution-GVN, 1990-. [Monthly event reports]. Bull Global Volc Network, v 15-33.

A submarine volcano detected during a 2003 NOAA bathymetric survey of the Mariana Island arc was found to be hydrothermally active and named NW Rota-1. The basaltic to basaltic-andesite seamount rises to within 517 m of the sea surface SW of Esmeralda Bank and lies 64 km NW of Rota Island and about 100 km north of Guam. When Northwest Rota-1 was revisited in 2004, a minor submarine eruption from a vent named Brimstone Pit on the upper south flank about 40 m below the summit intermittently ejected a plume several hundred meters high containing ash, rock particles, and molten sulfur droplets that adhered to the surface of the remotely operated submersible vehicle. The active vent was funnel-shaped, about 20 m wide and 12 m deep. NW Rota-1 is a large submarine volcano with prominent structural lineaments about a kilometer apart cutting across the summit of the edifice and down the NE and SW flanks.