Asuncion

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 19.671°N
  • 145.406°E

  • 857 m
    2811 ft

  • 284150
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Asuncion.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Asuncion.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1924 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
1906 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Upper SE and west flanks
[ 1901 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1819 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1786 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1775 ± 10 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2  
[ 1690 ± 10 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Bloomer S H, Stern R J, Smoot N C, 1989. Physical volcanology of the submarine Mariana and Volcano arcs. Bull Volc, 51: 210-224.

Corwin G, 1971. Quaternary volcanics of the Mariana Islands. Unpublished manuscript, 137 p.

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Kuno H, 1962. Japan, Taiwan and Marianas. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 11: 1-332.

A single large asymmetrical stratovolcano, steeper on the NE side, forms 3-km-wide Asuncion Island. The steep NE flank of the 857-m-high volcano terminates in high sea cliffs. The gentler SW flanks have low-angle slopes bounded by sea cliffs only a few meters high. The southern flank of the volcano is cut by a large landslide scar. The southern flanks and western flanks of the volcano are mantled by ash deposits that may have originated during eruptions in historical time. An explosive eruption in 1906 also produced lava flows that descended about half way down the western and SE flanks, but several other historical eruption reports are of uncertain validity.