Maug Islands

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 20.02°N
  • 145.22°E

  • 227 m
    745 ft

  • 284143
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Maug Islands.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Maug Islands.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Maug Islands. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Corwin G, 1971. Quaternary volcanics of the Mariana Islands. Unpublished manuscript, 137 p.

Embly B, Resing J, Chadwick B, 2003. The Thomas G. Thompson explores Maug caldera. Nat Oceanic Atmosph Admin (NOAA, http://oceanexplorer.noaa.gov/explorations/03fire/logs/feb24/ (accessed July 25, 2003).

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Meijer A, Reagan M, 1983. Origin of K2O-SiO2 trends in volcanoes of the Mariana arc. Geology, 11: 67-71.

Three small elongated islands up to 2.3 km long mark the northern, western, and eastern rims of a largely submerged 2.5-km-wide caldera. The highest point of the Maug Islands reach only 227 m above sea level; the submerged southern notch on the caldera rim lies about 140 m below sea level. The caldera has an average submarine depth of about 200 m and contains a twin-peaked central lava dome that rises to within about 20 m of the sea surface. The Maug Islands form a twin volcanic massif with Supply Reef, about 11 km to the north. The truncated inner walls of the caldera on all three islands expose lava flows and pyroclastic deposits that are cut by radial dikes; bedded ash deposits overlie the outer flanks of the islands. No eruptions are known since the discovery of the islands by Espinosa in 1522. The presence of poorly developed coral reefs and coral on the central lava dome suggests a long period of general quiescence, although it does not exclude mild eruptions (Corwin, 1971). A recent NOAA expedition detected possible evidence of submarine geothermal activity.