Myojinsho

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 31.888°N
  • 139.918°E

  • 11 m
    36 ft

  • 284070
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Myojinsho.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Myojinsho.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1988 Mar 18 ] [ 1988 Mar 19 ] Uncertain 0   Myojinsho
[ 1987 Oct 21 ] [ 1987 Dec 9 ] Uncertain 0   Myojinsho
[ 1986 Oct 24 ] [ 1986 Oct 24 ] Uncertain 0   Myojinsho
[ 1983 May 12 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 0   Myojinsho
[ 1982 Aug 10 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 0   Myojinsho
[ 1980 Nov 15 ] [ 1980 Dec 23 ] Uncertain 0   Myojinsho
[ 1979 Jul 13 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 0   Myojinsho
[ 1971 Mar 18 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 0  
1970 Jan 29 1970 Jun Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Myojinsho
1960 Jul 21 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Myojinsho
1959 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1958 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1957 May 2 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1955 Jun 25 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations 4 km north of Bayonnaise Rocks
1954 Nov 4 1954 Nov 5 Confirmed 0 Historical Observations Myojinsho
1952 Sep 16 1953 Oct Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Myojinsho
1946 Feb 4 ± 4 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Island at 31.95 N 140.02 E
1934 May Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations 9 km E of Bayonnaise Rocks
1915 Feb 1915 Jul Confirmed 0 Historical Observations 11 km east, 19 km NE, 4 km SW
1906 Apr 7 1906 Apr 14 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations 9-15 km SE of Bayonnaise Rocks
1896 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations 14 km north of Bayonnaise Rocks
1871 Unknown Confirmed 0 Unknown 31.50 N 139.50 E (approx.)
1869 May 6 Unknown Confirmed 0 Unknown

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Fiske R S, Cashman K V, Shibata A, Watanabe K, 1998. Tephra dispersal from Myojinsho, Japan, during its shallow submarine eruption of 1952-1953. Bull Volc, 59: 262-275.

Green J, Short N M, 1971. Volcanic Landforms and Surface Features: a Photographic Atlas and Glossary. New York: Springer-Verlag, 519 p.

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Kuno H, 1962. Japan, Taiwan and Marianas. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 11: 1-332.

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Newhall C G, Dzurisin D, 1988. Historical unrest at large calderas of the world. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1855: 1108 p, 2 vol.

Niino H, 1953. Report on the submarine eruption of Myojin-sho, Part 2. The second survey of Myojin-sho. Tokyo Univ Fisheries, 40: 33-43 and 5 plates.

Niino H, Kumagori T, Tsuya H, Morimoto R, Ossaka G, Hamaguchi H, Tatsumoto M, Matsue Y, Komai Y, Arihasa C, Ebina K, Takagi K, 1953. Report on the submarine eruption of Myojin-sho, Part 1. First survey of Myojin-sho. Tokyo Univ Fisheries, 40: 1-32 and 24 plates.

Suwa A, 1978. The surveillance of volcanic activities in Japan. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 23: 83-89 (in Japanese with English abs).

Ueda Y, Onodera K, Ootani Y, Suzuki A, 2001. Geophysical structure of the Myojin-sho caldera and its volcanological interpretation. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 46: 175-185 (in Japanese with English abs).

Yuasa M, 1995. Myojin Knoll, Izu-Ogasawara Arc: submersible study of submarine pumice volcano. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 40: 277-284 (in Japanese with English abs).

Yuasa M, Murakami F, Saito E, Watanabe K, 1991. Submarine topography of seamounts on the volcanic front of the Izu-Ogasawara (Bonin) Arc. Bull Geol Surv Japan, 42: 703-743.

Beyonesu Rocks represent part of the barely exposed rim of the largely submarine Myojinsho caldera. Formation of the 8-9 km wide caldera was followed by construction of a large (2.6 cu km) lava dome and/or lava flow complex on the caldera floor, originally located at a depth of 1000-1100 m. Most historical eruptions, recorded since the late-19th century, have occurred from the large post-caldera Myojinsho lava dome on the NE rim of the caldera. Deposits from submarine pyroclastic flows associated with growth of the dacitic lava dome mantle the conical dome and extend into the NE part of the caldera and down its outer slopes. An explosive submarine eruption from Myojinsho in 1952 destroyed a Japanese research vessel, killing all 31 on board. Submarine eruptions have also been observed from other points on the caldera rim and outside of the caldera. The Beyonesu Rocks were named after the French warship the Bayonnaise, which was surveying volcanic islands south of Tokyo Bay in 1850.