Akagisan

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  • Japan
  • Honshu
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 36.56°N
  • 139.193°E

  • 1828 m
    5996 ft

  • 283130
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Akagisan.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Akagisan.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1938 Jul 16 (in or before) ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1251 May 18 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Hayakawa Y, 1996. . (pers. comm.).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Kobayshi K, Nakamura E, 2001. Geochemical evolution of Akagi volcano, NE Japan: implications for interaction between island-arc magma and lower crust, and generation of isotopically various magmas. J Petr, 42: 2303-2331.

Kuno H, 1962. Japan, Taiwan and Marianas. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 11: 1-332.

Moriya I, 1970. History of Akagi volcano. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 15: 120-131 (in Japanese with English abs).

Murayama I, 1989. Volcanoes of Japan (II). Tokyo: Daimedo, 285 p (in Japanese).

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Suzuki T, 1996. Discharge rates of fallout tephra and frequency of plinian eruptions during the last 400,000 years in the southern Northeast Japan arc. Quat Internatl, 34-36: 79-87.

Suzuki T, 1990. Tephrochronological study on the 200,000 years eruptive history of Akagi volcano in north Kanto, central Japan. Chigaku Zasshi (Jour Geog), 99: 60-75 (in Japanese with English abs).

The broad, low dominantly andesitic Akagisan volcano rises above the northern end of the Kanto Plain. It contains an elliptical, 3 x 4 km summit caldera with post-caldera lava domes arranged along a NW-SE line. Lake Ono is located at the NE end of the caldera. An older stratovolcano was partially destroyed by edifice collapse, producing a debris-avalanche deposit along the south flank. A series of large plinian eruptions accompanied growth of a second stratovolcano during the Pleistocene. Construction of the central cone in the late-Pleistocene summit caldera began following the last of the plinian eruptions about 31,000 years ago. During historical time unusual activity was recorded on several occasions during the 9th century, but reported eruptions in 1251 and 1938 are considered uncertain.