Hakoneyama

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  • Japan
  • Honshu
  • Complex
  • 1170 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 35.233°N
  • 139.021°E

  • 1438 m
    4717 ft

  • 283020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

8 August-14 August 2001

Elevated seismicity had been recorded at Hakone during June 2001 to at least 8 August. The seismicity was associated with a small amount of inflation that was centered at the volcano. Earthquake hypocenters occurred at depths less than 5 km beneath the volcano. A small swarm was also recorded under the northern end of the Ashino-ko (caldera lake). JMA noted that the change in activity might not be a precursor to an eruption since similar activity has occurred in the past that was not followed by an eruption.

Source: Volcano Research Center-Earthquake Research Institute (University of Tokyo)



 Available Weekly Reports


2001: August


8 August-14 August 2001

Elevated seismicity had been recorded at Hakone during June 2001 to at least 8 August. The seismicity was associated with a small amount of inflation that was centered at the volcano. Earthquake hypocenters occurred at depths less than 5 km beneath the volcano. A small swarm was also recorded under the northern end of the Ashino-ko (caldera lake). JMA noted that the change in activity might not be a precursor to an eruption since similar activity has occurred in the past that was not followed by an eruption.

Source: Volcano Research Center-Earthquake Research Institute (University of Tokyo)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1170 ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) Owakudani, Hk-Ow 3-5 tephras
0050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NE of Kamiyama, Hk-Ow2 tephra
1050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology NE of Kamiyama, Hk-Ow1 tephra
1200 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Radiocarbon (corrected) NW side of Kami-yama (Kanmuriga-take)
1400 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (corrected) NW side of Kami-yama (Kanmuriga-take)
3700 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 1 Radiocarbon (corrected) Futago-yama
6000 BCE ± 100 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (corrected) Kami-yama, Hk-Km5 tephra

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Hakamata K, Sugiyama S, Imanaga I, Mannen K, Oki Y, 2005. K-Ar ages of Hakone volcano, Japan. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 50: 285-299 (in Japanese with English abs).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1975. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan. Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 119 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Kobayashi M, Mannen K, Okuno M, Nakamura , Hakamata K, 2006. The Owakidani tephra group: a newly discovered post-magmatic eruption product of Hakano volcano, Japan. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 51: 245-256 (in Japanese with English abs).

Kobayashi M, Okuno M, Nakamura T, 1997. 14C ages of pyroclastic-flow deposits from central cones on the western slope of Old Somma of Hakone volcano, central Japan. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 42: 355-358 (in Japanese).

Kudo T, Hoshizumi H, 2006-. Catalog of eruptive events within the last 10,000 years in Japan, database of Japanese active volcanoes. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://riodb02.ibase.aist.go.jp/db099/eruption/index.html.

Kuno H, 1962. Japan, Taiwan and Marianas. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 11: 1-332.

Kuno H, Oki Y, Ogino K, Hirota S, 1970. Structure of the Hakone caldera as revealed by drilling. Bull Volc, 34: 713-725.

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Oki Y, Aramaki S, Nakamura K, Hakamata K, 1978. Volcanoes of Hakone, Izu and Oshima. Hakone: Hakone Town Office, 59 p.

Hakoneyama volcano is truncated by two overlapping calderas, the largest of which is 10 x 11 km wide. The calderas were formed as a result of two major explosive eruptions about 180,000 and 49,000-60,000 years ago. Scenic Lake Ashi lies between the SW caldera wall and a half dozen post-caldera lava domes that were constructed along a SW-NE trend cutting through the center of the calderas. Dome growth occurred progressively to the south, and the largest and youngest of these, Kamiyama, forms the high point of Hakoneyama. The calderas are breached to the east by the Hayakawa canyon. A phreatic explosion about 3000 years ago was followed by collapse of the NW side of Kamiyama, damming the Hayakawa valley and creating Lake Ashi. The latest magmatic eruptive activity about 2900 years ago produced a pyroclastic flow and a lava dome in the explosion crater, although phreatic eruptions took place as recently as the 12-13th centuries CE. Seismic swarms have occurred during the 20th century. Lake Ashi, along with major thermal areas in the caldera, forms a popular resort area SW of Tokyo.