Ibusuki Volcanic Field

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 31.22°N
  • 130.57°E

  • 924 m
    3031 ft

  • 282070
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Ibusuki Volcanic Field.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Ibusuki Volcanic Field.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1615 Aug 7 (?) ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain     Kaimon
0885 Aug 29 0885 Sep 28 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations Kaimon
[ 0882 Nov ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2   Kaimon
0874 Mar 29 0874 Jul (?) Confirmed 4 Historical Observations Kaimon
[ 0866 May ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2   Kaimon
[ 0860 Apr ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 2   Kaimon
0770 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-beta
0720 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-gamma
0660 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon
0600 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-delta
0550 (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-epsilon
0270 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-zeta
0150 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-eta
0130 (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-theta
0030 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-iota
0080 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-kappa
0270 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-lamda
0650 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-mu
0700 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra layer Km-nu
1450 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Mizunashi, Kagami, Ikezoko maars
1500 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra layer Km-xi
1550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Nabeshima-dake
1610 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra layer Km-omicron
1780 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra set Km-pi
2010 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 4 Tephrochronology Kaimon, Tephra layer Km-rho
2690 BCE ± 75 years Unknown Confirmed 5 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Ikeda-ko caldera, Tephra layer Ikp
5050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Tephrochronology Unagi, Narikawa and Yamakawa maars

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1975. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan. Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 119 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 1996. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (second edition). Tokyo: Japan Meteorological Agency, 502 p (in Japanese).

Japan Meteorological Agency, 2013. National Catalogue of the Active Volcanoes in Japan (fourth edition, English version). Japan Meteorological Agency.

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Kuno H, 1962. Japan, Taiwan and Marianas. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 11: 1-332.

Nakamura M, 1980. Possibility of new volcanic activity at Ibusuki volcanic field, Kyushu, Japan. Bull Volc Soc Japan (Kazan), 25: 195-205 (in Japanese with English abs).

Nakano S, Yamamoto T, Iwaya T, Itoh J, Takada A, 2001-. Quaternary Volcanoes of Japan. Geol Surv Japan, AIST, http://www.aist.go.jp/RIODB/strata/VOL_JP/.

Sumi K, Takashima I, 1976. Absolute ages of the hydrothermal alteration halos and associated volcanic rocks in some Japanese geothermal fields. In: {Proc 2nd United Nations Symp Devel Use Geotherm Resour, San Francisco}, 1: 625-634.

Ibusuki volcanic field at the southern tip of Kyushu consists of numerous central cones and maars, the 4.5-km-wide Ikeda caldera, and Kaimondake stratovolcano. The symmetrical andesitic Kaimondake is the most prominent feature of the field and is capped by a lava dome. Ibusuki has been very active during the Holocene, forming the Ikeda caldera about 4600 years ago, numerous maars and lava domes. Kaimondake formed during the last 4000 years, from which all eruptive activity has occurred fter about 2650 years ago. Its last eruption took place in the 9th century. JMA (2013) breaks out Kaimondake as a separate volcano from the Ikeda caldera, Yamagawa maar group, and caldera lava domes. The large Pleistocene Ata caldera, once thought to partially underlie this volcanic field, is now considered to be located farther to the east beneath Kagoshima Bay.