Kueishantao

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  • Taiwan
  • Taiwan
  • Stratovolcano
  • 1785 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 24.85°N
  • 121.92°E

  • 401 m
    1315 ft

  • 281031
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Kueishantao.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Kueishantao.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1785 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Chen C H, 1981. Petrochemical aspects and tectonic implication of Pleistocene andesitic rocks of northern Taiwan and off-shore islets. IAVCEI 1981 Tokyo Mtg Abs, p 50-51.

Chen C-H, Lee T, Shieh Y-N, Chen C-H, Hsu W-Y, 1995. Magmatism at the onset of back-arc basin spreading in the Okinawa Trough. J Volc Geotherm Res, 69: 313-322.

Ho C S, 1988. An introduction to the geology of Taiwan; explanatory text of the geologic map of Taiwan. Taipei: Central Geol Surv, Ministry Economic Affairs, 192 p.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Liu J, Taniguchi H, 2001. Active volcanoes in China. Tohoku Asian Studies, 6: 173-189.

Kueishantao Island, whose summit is 401 m above sea level, is the southernmost of five small volcanic islands off the NE coast of Taiwan. Kueishantao, also known as Guieshan Island, consists of andesitic lava flows and volcaniclastic material. It is the southwesternmost volcano along the axis of the Okinawa Trough back-arc basin that extends to the NE from Taiwan to Unzen volcano in Kyushu. The SW tip of the Okinawa Trough extends past Kueishantao onto the Ilao Plain on the island of Taiwan. The island is known as "Turtle Mountain Island" due to its profile as seen from some points on the coast of Taiwan. Historical accounts during the time of King Qianlong of the Qing Dynasty (1775-1795 CE) noted the Guieshan mountain split open with a blood-red lava flow. Kueishantao displays vigorous active submarine fumaroles and solfataras that discolor seawater over wide areas.