Tengchong

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 25.23°N
  • 98.5°E

  • 2865 m
    9397 ft

  • 275110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Tengchong.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Tengchong.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1609 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain     Dayingshan or Heikongshan
5750 BCE ± 1000 years Unknown Confirmed   Uranium-series

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Chen S (ed), 1986. Atlas of Geo-Science, Analysis of Landsat Imagery in China. Beijing: Chinese Acad Sci Press, 228 p.

Du J, Liu C, Fu B, Ninomiya Y, Zhang Y, Wang C, Wang H, Sun Z, 2005. Variations of geothermometry and chemical-isotopic compositions of hot spring fluids in the Rehai geothermal field, southwestern China. J Volc Geotherm Res, 142: 243-261.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Wang F, Peng Z, Chen W, Wang Z, Yang J, Zhang Z, Hu T, 2000. High-precision thermal ionization mass spectrometry dating of young volcanic rocks by using U-series method. Chinese Sci Bull, 45: 83-87.

Wang F, Peng Z, Zhu R, He H, Yang L, 2006. Petrogenesis and magma residence time of lavas from Tengchong volcanic field (China): evidence from U series disequilibria and 40Ar/39Ar dating. Geochem Geophys Geosyst, 7, doi:10.1029/2005GC001023.

Wei H, Sparks R S J, Liu R, Fan Q, Wang Y, Hong H, Zhang H, Chen H, Jiang C, Dong J, Zheng Y, Pan Y, 2003. Three active volcanoes in China and their hazards. J Asian Earth Sci, 21: 515-526.

Whitford-Stark J L, 1987. A survey of Cenozoic volcanism on mainland Asia. Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap, 213: 1-74.

Whitford-Stark J L, 1987. . (pers. comm.).

The Tengchong volcanic district, located in southern China near the border with Burma (Myanmar), was active during five periods ranging from the early Pliocene to the Holocene. Three main stages prroduced Pliocene to mid-Pleistocene basaltic rocks, mid- to late-Pleistocene silicic pyroclastic rocks, and Holocene basaltic andesites. The youngest volcanism in the 600 sq km volcanic field occurred in two stages during the early and late Holocene. Volcanic cones at the northern end of the field are sparsely vegetated and have clearly visible lava flows. Three basaltic-andesite centers, Dayinshshan, Maanshan, and possibly Heikongshan, are of Holocene age. An unconfirmed explosive eruption took place in 1609, and there are unconfirmed reports of eruptions in the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911). The Tengchong district is the site of active geothermal fields, the largest and highest temperature of which is the Rehai geothermal field. More than 20 hydrothermal eruptions have occurred at the Rehai geothermal field since 1993.