Popa

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 20.92°N
  • 95.25°E

  • 1518 m
    4979 ft

  • 275080
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Popa.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Popa.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
0442 BCE Unknown Confirmed   Anthropology

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Stephenson D, Marshall T R, 1984. The petrology and mineralogy of Mt. Popa volcano and the nature of the late-Cenozoic Burma volcanic area. J Geol Soc London, 141: 747-762.

Whitford-Stark J L, 1987. A survey of Cenozoic volcanism on mainland Asia. Geol Soc Amer Spec Pap, 213: 1-74.

Mount Popa, in central Burma (Myanmar), is a large, steep-sided composite cone that rises 1150 m above a surrounding lava plateau to a height of 1518 m. The main edifice consists of overlapping basaltic and basaltic-andesite lava flows, pyroclastic deposits, and scoriaceous material originating from strombolian eruptions that may have dominated later stages of the volcano's growth. Mount Popa contains a 1.6-km-wide, 850-m-deep horseshoe-shaped caldera that is widely breached to the NW and formed as a result of slope failure. A 3 cu km debris-avalanche deposit covers an area of 27 sq km north of the breach. Local legends describe an eruption in 442 BCE (Stephenson and Marshall, 1984).