Mariveles

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  • Philippines
  • Luzon
  • Stratovolcano
  • 2050 BCE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.52°N
  • 120.47°E

  • 1388 m
    4553 ft

  • 273081
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Mariveles.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Mariveles.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

COMVOL, 1981. Catalogue of Philippine volcanoes and solfataric areas. Philippine Comm Volc, 87 p.

Defant M J, Maury R C, Ripley E M, Feigenson M D, Jacques D, 1991. An example of island-arc petrogenesis: geochemistry and petrology of the southern Luzon arc, Philippines. J Petr, 32: 455-500.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1979. . (pers. comm.).

PHIVOLCS, 2004-. Volcanoes. http://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph/Volcanolist/.

Wolfe J A, Self S, 1983. Structural lineaments and Neogene volcanism in southwestern Luzon. In: Hayes D E (ed) {The Tectonic and Geological Evolution of Southeast Asian Seas and Islands: Part 2}, Amer Geophys Union Monograph 27.

The low, but massive Mariveles stratovolcano lies at the southern end of the Bataan Peninsula, on the west side of Manila Bay. The morphologically youthful, dominantly andesitic volcano rises to 1388 m and is truncated by a 4-km-wide caldera that drains to the north. Mount Slamet on the north and Mount Limay on the east are major, youthful-looking flank cones. A mid-Holocene eruption has been radiocarbon dated at 4000 years before present.