Iriga

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  • Philippines
  • Luzon
  • Stratovolcano
  • Unknown
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 13.457°N
  • 123.457°E

  • 1196 m
    3923 ft

  • 273041
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Iriga.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Iriga.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 1628 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Aguila L G, Newhall C G, Miller C D, Listanco E L, 1986. Reconnaissance geology of a large debris avalanche from Iriga volcano, Philippines. Philippine J Volc, 3: 54-72.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

PHIVOLCS, 2004-. Volcanoes. http://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph/Volcanolist/.

Mount Iriga is a small stratovolcano that rises to 1196 m immediately SW of Lake Buhi. The dominantly andesitic stratovolcano has satellitic cinder cones of basaltic composition. A large breached crater that opens to the SE was formed as a result of a major debris avalanche that buried several villages and formed a broad hummocky deposit that extends across the plain south of Lake Buhi. This catastrophic event was at one time considered to have occurred during 1628 CE, but later work has shown that the collapse and eruption occurred earlier at some unknown date during the Holocene. The avalanche was followed by phreatic explosions that created a small crater at the base of the scarp.