Mandalagan

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 10.65°N
  • 123.25°E

  • 1885 m
    6183 ft

  • 272030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Mandalagan.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Mandalagan.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Mandalagan. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

COMVOL, 1981. Catalogue of Philippine volcanoes and solfataric areas. Philippine Comm Volc, 87 p.

Del Mundo E T, Arpa M C, 2007. . (pers. comm.).

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Neumann van Padang M, 1953. Philippine Islands and Cochin China. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 2: 1-49.

PHIVOLCS, 2004-. Volcanoes. http://www.phivolcs.dost.gov.ph/Volcanolist/.

Solidum R U, Castillo P R, Hawkins J W, 2003. Geochemistry of lavas from Negros Arc, west central Philippines: insights into the contribution from the subducting slab. Geochem Geophys Geosyst, 4: doi:10.1029/2003GC00513.

von Biedersee H, Pichler H, 1995. The Canlaon and its neighbouring volcanoes in the Negros Belt/Philippines. J Southeast Asian Earth Sci, 11: 111-123.

The deeply dissected, dominantly andesitic-to-dacitic Mandalagan volcanic complex on northern Negros Island contains a vigorous solfataric area at a highly altered domed structure. The complex consists of seven volcanic centers, including at least five craters and/or calderas up to 2 km in diameter. One solfataric area emits a high-temperature (106 degrees C) plume to 30 m height with a roaring noise like a high-pressure geothermal borehole. The age of the most recent eruptive activity at the 1885-m-high volcano, which produced a thin basaltic lava flow, is not known.