Awu

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 3.67°N
  • 125.5°E

  • 1320 m
    4330 ft

  • 267040
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

11 May-17 May 2005

At 1715 on 16 May a pilot reported a low-level plume above Awu. No ash was seen in satellite imagery about one hour or eight hours later.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)



 Available Weekly Reports


2005: May
2004: May | June
2002: November


11 May-17 May 2005

At 1715 on 16 May a pilot reported a low-level plume above Awu. No ash was seen in satellite imagery about one hour or eight hours later.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


16 June-22 June 2004

During 15-16 June, there was no significant volcanic or seismic activity at Awu. "White smoke" rose about 50-100 m above the summit. Awu remained at Alert Level 3 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


9 June-15 June 2004

On 13 June, DVGHM reduced the Alert Level at Awu from 4 (the highest level) to 3 after volcanic activity decreased. On 9 June, two moderate explosions rose about 2 and 3 km above the volcano. Ash drifted SW and was deposited in the villages of Tabukan utara and part of Kendahe, and at the Taha airport. After an eruption on 10 June at 0529, volcanic activity dramatically decreased with only "white smoke" rising ~50 m. This low-level activity continued through at least 14 June and the Taha airport planned to reopen. According to a news report, most of the ~20,000 people who were evacuated from near the volcano around 8 June were permitted to return home. Only some villagers from the N slope of the volcano remained in shelters.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM, Agence France-Presse (AFP), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


2 June-8 June 2004

According to news reports, Awu began erupting small ash plumes on 5 June. On 7 June, following a 48-hour-long period of increasing activity, authorities raised the Volcano Warning Level from Alert to Ready at 1040 and finally to Beware, the highest level of alert, at 1600. By 8 June, continuous small earthquakes were occurring and small eruptions produced gas-and-ash plumes and threw small ballistics up to 2 km above the summit. Up to 20,000 people have been evacuated from the area around the volcano.

Sources: ABC News - Australian Broadcasting Corporation, Agence France-Presse (AFP), Reuters, The Jakarta Post, Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


19 May-25 May 2004

DVGHM reported a sudden increase in seismicity at Awu beginning on 16 May when 12 volcanic earthquakes were recorded. In addition, tremor was recorded during 1110-1540. Gas plumes rose ~75 m above the crater that were thicker than earlier in the month, but they did not change color or form clumps. On 18 May, six volcanic earthquakes were recorded and tremor continued. The same day DVGHM raised the Alert Level from 1 to 2. According to news reports, on 21 May hundreds of residents of the villages of Manente, Kolongan, Kendahe, and North Tabukan began to flee due to fears of an eruption.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM, Agence France-Presse (AFP), The Jakarta Post


27 November-3 December 2002

Seismicity increased at Awu on 15 November, but during 19-24 November decreased back to "normal levels." There were no surface changes around the volcano's summit. Awu remained at Alert Level 2 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


20 November-26 November 2002

VSI increased the Alert Level at Awu on 15 November following an increase in seismicity. Normally four earthquakes occur per day at the volcano, but 32 volcanic earthquakes were recorded on 15 November during 0000-0900. No surface changes were observed around the volcano's summit.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2004 Jun 2 (in or before) 2004 Aug (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1992 Apr 7 ± 9 days Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations SE part of summit crater
[ 1968 Aug ] [ 1968 Sep ] Uncertain 2  
1966 Aug 12 1966 Oct Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1930 Dec 1931 Dec Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1922 Jun 20 1922 Sep Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1921 Feb 1921 Oct 1 ± 90 days Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1913 Mar 14 1913 Mar 14 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1893 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1892 Jun 7 1892 Jun 12 (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1885 Aug 18 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1883 Aug 25 1883 Aug 26 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1875 Aug 1875 Aug Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1856 Mar 2 1856 Mar 17 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1812 Aug 6 1812 Aug 8 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
1711 Dec 10 1711 Dec 16 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
[ 1699 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1646 ± 5 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1640 Dec ] [ 1641 Jan 4 ] Uncertain 3  

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Kusumadinata K, 1979. Data Dasar Gunungapi Indonesia. Bandung: Volc Surv Indonesia, 820 p.

Matahelumual J, 1985. G Awu. Bull Volc Surv Indonesia, 107: 1-51 (in Indonesian).

Morrice M G, Jezek P A, Gill J B, Whitford D J, Monoarfa M, 1983. An introduction to the Sangihe arc: volcanism accompanying arc-arc collision in the Molucca Sea, Indonesia. J Volc Geotherm Res, 19: 135-165.

Neumann van Padang M, 1951. Indonesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 1: 1-271.

The massive Gunung Awu stratovolcano occupies the northern end of Great Sangihe Island, the largest of the Sangihe arc. Deep valleys that form passageways for lahars dissect the flanks of the 1320-m-high volcano, which was constructed within a 4.5-km-wide caldera. Awu is one of Indonesia's deadliest volcanoes; powerful explosive eruptions in 1711, 1812, 1856, 1892, and 1966 produced devastating pyroclastic flows and lahars that caused more than 8000 cumulative fatalities. Awu contained a summit crater lake that was 1 km wide and 172 m deep in 1922, but was largely ejected during the 1966 eruption.