Ruang

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
  Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 2.3°N
  • 125.37°E

  • 725 m
    2378 ft

  • 267010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Weekly Report: 30 October-5 November 2002


During 21-27 October, a thick low-level ash plume infrequently rose above Ruang. Rainfall on 23 October caused lahars to flow down the volcano's flanks during 1445-1545. Ruang remained at Alert Level 2 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


Most Recent Bulletin Report: February 2004 (BGVN 29:02)


Eruption on 25 September 2002 is the largest in Indonesia in many years

The 25 September 2002 eruption of Ruang (BGVN 27:10 and 28:08) was, according to the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the largest in Indonesia for many years and was well observed by satellite sensors. The eruption cloud reached a height of ~ 20 km, and a pyroclastic flow toward the SE damaged an area 1.6 km². Although no village was hit by the pyroclastic flow, two were heavily damaged by very thick ash material.

The Darwin VAAC and Bureau of Meteorology have published images and animations of the eruption clouds (figure 2). The satellites and images included those from Aqua/MODIS, GMS Java Animation, and AVHRR sensors. Some ash clouds dispersed towards Singapore and Jakarta. A higher level cloud remained nearly stationary near the tropopause (the top of the troposphere, where most of the Earth's weather occurs). The highest cloud moved eastwards in the stratosphere. The color/shading reflects the strength of the detected ash signal.

Figure 2. Night-time infrared image of the Ruang eruption processed to highlight volcanic ash. N is towards the top; the local island margins are shown, Sulawesi to the right and Borneo to the left. The enhanced areas disclose the W portion of the plume drifting over Borneo and the higher E ash and gas cloud nearly stationary over the eruption site. A third area of ash and ice cloud is nearly invisible near the bottom center. Courtesy of NASA, NOAA, and the Darwin VAAC.

The TOMS scientists published an image on their website (figure 3), described as follows: "The TOMS overpass on September 25 was too early to capture the fresh eruption cloud, but ash and SO2 were evident on the following day. The aerosol signal over S Borneo is at least partly due to smoke from biomass burning; the ash cloud from Ruang can be seen over NE Borneo. A data gap may be obscuring any SO2 or ash immediately W of Ruang."

Figure 3. Ruang erupted on 25 September 2002. A pass the next day of the Earth Probe satellite with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument yielded this map of SO2 concentrations. Courtesy of Simon Carn and Arlin Krueger.

Information Contacts: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology, Northern Territory Regional Office, PO Box 40050, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia (URL: http://www.bom.gov.au/info/vaac/, Email: darwin.vaac@bom.gov.au); Nia Haerani, Directorate of Volcanology and Geological Hazards (formerly VSI), Jalan Diponegoro No 57, Bandung 40122, Indonesia (URL: http://www.vsi.esdm.go.id/); Simon A. Carn and Arlin Krueger, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (NASA/UMBC), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA (URL: http://skye.gsfc.nasa.gov/).

Index of Weekly Reports


2002: September | October

Weekly Reports


30 October-5 November 2002

During 21-27 October, a thick low-level ash plume infrequently rose above Ruang. Rainfall on 23 October caused lahars to flow down the volcano's flanks during 1445-1545. Ruang remained at Alert Level 2 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM)


25 September-1 October 2002

VSI reported that following the 25 September Ruang eruption there was no significant volcanic activity; only thin white clouds rose 100 m above the summit. On 30 September VSI decreased the Alert Level at Ruang from 4 to 3 (on a scale of 1-4).

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


18 September-24 September 2002

VSI increased the Alert Level at Ruang to 4 (the highest level) when the volcano began to erupt on 25 September at 0100. During the 7-hour eruption an ash cloud rose 0.5-1 km above the summit. Ruang erupted again at 1140, producing an ash cloud that VSI reported rose to 5 km above the summit. According to the Darwin VAAC, satellite imagery revealed that an ash cloud reached ~16 km above the volcano. People living near the volcano at desa Pumpente and desa Laimpatehi were evacuated.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG, also known as CVGHM); Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

08/1996 (BGVN 21:08) Plume observed in late June

10/2002 (BGVN 27:10) Eruption on 25 September 2002 sends ash to at least 5 km

08/2003 (BGVN 28:08) Rapid decrease in activity following September 2002 eruption

02/2004 (BGVN 29:02) Eruption on 25 September 2002 is the largest in Indonesia in many years




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


08/1996 (BGVN 21:08) Plume observed in late June

Pilots from Qantas Airlines reported an eruption around 1600 on 27 June. A plume moved W and reached an altitude of about 6,000 m. However, the eruption was not visible in GMS satellite imagery.

Information Contacts: Bureau of Meteorology, Northern Territory Regional Office, P.O. Box 735, Darwin, NT 0801 Australia; NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Analysis Branch, Room 401, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA.
Download or Cite this Report

10/2002 (BGVN 27:10) Eruption on 25 September 2002 sends ash to at least 5 km

The last reported activity at Ruang occurred when Qantas Airlines pilots observed an eruption around 1600 on 27 June 1996 (BGVN 21:08). A resulting plume moved W and reached an altitude of ~6 km. However, the eruption was not visible in GMS satellite imagery. The last known confirmed eruption at Ruang occurred in 1949.

A drastic increase of seismic events - from 3 to 24 events/day - was observed on 24 September by the Volcanological Survey of Indonesia (VSI). The next day, people near the volcano reported hearing a noise, and ash eruptions began by 0100. By 0300 ash emissions were continuous, and ash began falling around Ruang island and the nearby island of Tagulandang. Observers reported that the sounds accompanying the eruption were weak. By 0400 more than 1,000 people living near the volcano were evacuated to a nearby island. Around 0800, the Alert Level advanced to the highest status (level 4).

The first strong eruption commenced at 1140 on 25 September, producing thick black clouds that rose 3 km. Ten minutes later, a second eruption sent ash clouds rising 5 km. At 1210 the activity subsided enough to observe glowing material on E flank. The specific eruption site has not been firmly established. It has been presumed by VSI that it originated from "Crater II" or "where the 1949 lava originated (E side of summit)." The eruption column was reported from ground-based observations as rising to at least 5 km, and by Darwin VAAC advisories as rising to about 17 km. According to the Darwin VAAC, satellite imagery revealed that the ash cloud drifted westward to Borneo and Sumatra. Satellite images from NOAA showed the plume drifting SW with other components drifting W (figure 1). By 30 September the volcano was quiet with only a thin white plume rising about 100 m. The Alert Level was reduced from 4 to 3 on 30 September 2002.

Figure 1. Satellite imagery on 25 September 2002 showed a large eruption plume from Ruang. The volcano's location is shown by the arrow. The plume appears to branch into SW- and W-drifting components. Courtesy NOAA.

Information Contacts: Volcanological Survey of Indonesia (VSI), Jalan Diponegoro No. 57, Bandung 40122, Indonesia (URL: http://www.vsi.esdm.go.id/); Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Bureau of Meteorology, Northern Territory Regional Office, P.O. Box 735, Darwin, NT 0801 Australia; NOAA/NESDIS Satellite Analysis Branch, Room 401, 5200 Auth Road, Camp Springs, MD 20746, USA.
Download or Cite this Report

08/2003 (BGVN 28:08) Rapid decrease in activity following September 2002 eruption

Volcanic activity had decreased by 30 September 2002 after a strong eruption on the 25th. After the hazard status was lowered from Alert Level 4 to 3 on 30 September, it was dropped to Level 2 during the week of 7-13 October. However, activity continued to be higher than normal that week, with frequent strong emissions and "thick white ash" rising ~100 m above the summit. Emission earthquakes decreased (table 1). High-pressure plumes decreased in frequency from 14 October through 10 November, but "thick white ash" continued to rise from the summit. No ashfall was reported during October or November. Rainfall on 23 October caused a lahar. No volcanic or emission earthquakes were recorded during 4-10 November, and the Alert Level was reduced to level 1.

Table 1. Seismicity at Ruang, 7 October-10 November 2002. Courtesy of VSI.

    Week (2002)       Emission       Tectonic
                     earthquakes    earthquakes

    07 Oct-13 Oct         3             46
    14 Oct-20 Oct         6             39
    21 Oct-27 Oct         2             85
    28 Oct-03 Nov         2             63
    04 Nov-10 Nov        --             58

Information Contacts: Dali Ahmad, Volcanological Survey of Indonesia (VSI), Jalan Diponegoro No. 57, Bandung 40122, Indonesia (URL: http://www.vsi. esdm.go.id/).
Download or Cite this Report

02/2004 (BGVN 29:02) Eruption on 25 September 2002 is the largest in Indonesia in many years

The 25 September 2002 eruption of Ruang (BGVN 27:10 and 28:08) was, according to the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), the largest in Indonesia for many years and was well observed by satellite sensors. The eruption cloud reached a height of ~ 20 km, and a pyroclastic flow toward the SE damaged an area 1.6 km². Although no village was hit by the pyroclastic flow, two were heavily damaged by very thick ash material.

The Darwin VAAC and Bureau of Meteorology have published images and animations of the eruption clouds (figure 2). The satellites and images included those from Aqua/MODIS, GMS Java Animation, and AVHRR sensors. Some ash clouds dispersed towards Singapore and Jakarta. A higher level cloud remained nearly stationary near the tropopause (the top of the troposphere, where most of the Earth's weather occurs). The highest cloud moved eastwards in the stratosphere. The color/shading reflects the strength of the detected ash signal.

Figure 2. Night-time infrared image of the Ruang eruption processed to highlight volcanic ash. N is towards the top; the local island margins are shown, Sulawesi to the right and Borneo to the left. The enhanced areas disclose the W portion of the plume drifting over Borneo and the higher E ash and gas cloud nearly stationary over the eruption site. A third area of ash and ice cloud is nearly invisible near the bottom center. Courtesy of NASA, NOAA, and the Darwin VAAC.

The TOMS scientists published an image on their website (figure 3), described as follows: "The TOMS overpass on September 25 was too early to capture the fresh eruption cloud, but ash and SO2 were evident on the following day. The aerosol signal over S Borneo is at least partly due to smoke from biomass burning; the ash cloud from Ruang can be seen over NE Borneo. A data gap may be obscuring any SO2 or ash immediately W of Ruang."

Figure 3. Ruang erupted on 25 September 2002. A pass the next day of the Earth Probe satellite with the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer (TOMS) instrument yielded this map of SO2 concentrations. Courtesy of Simon Carn and Arlin Krueger.

Information Contacts: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), Commonwealth Bureau of Meteorology, Northern Territory Regional Office, PO Box 40050, Casuarina, NT 0811, Australia (URL: http://www.bom.gov.au/info/vaac/, Email: darwin.vaac@bom.gov.au); Nia Haerani, Directorate of Volcanology and Geological Hazards (formerly VSI), Jalan Diponegoro No 57, Bandung 40122, Indonesia (URL: http://www.vsi.esdm.go.id/); Simon A. Carn and Arlin Krueger, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (NASA/UMBC), University of Maryland, Baltimore County, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250, USA (URL: http://skye.gsfc.nasa.gov/).
Download or Cite this Report

Ruang volcano, not to be confused with the better known Raung volcano on Java, is the southernmost volcano in the Sangihe Island arc, north of Sulawesi Island. The 4 x 5 km island volcano rises to 725 m across a narrow strait SW of the larger Tagulandang Island. The summit of Ruang volcano contains a crater partially filled by a lava dome initially emplaced in 1904. Explosive eruptions recorded since 1808 have often been accompanied by lava dome formation and pyroclastic flows that have damaged inhabited areas.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2002 Sep 25 2002 Sep 29 (?) Confirmed 4 Historical Observations
[ 1996 Jun 27 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1949 Jan 5 1949 Jan 19 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1946 Oct 13 ] [ 1946 Oct 15 ] Discredited    
[ 1940 Apr ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1918 Feb ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1914 May 29 1915 Feb 28 ± 30 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1904 Apr 22 1905 May 27 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1889 Jun Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1874 Nov 15 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1871 Mar 2 1871 Mar 14 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1870 Aug 27 1870 Aug 28 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1856 Sep Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1840 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1836 Apr 22 (?) 1836 Apr 24 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1808 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Roeang | Roewang | Doeang | Doewang | Duwang | Duang
Ruang volcano, seen here from the nearby island of Tagulandang, forms a small 4 x 5 km island that is part of a chain of islands extending north from Sulawesi. Explosive eruptions, recorded in historical time since 1808, have been accompanied by pyroclastic flows and lava dome formation, and have frequently caused damage to populated areas.

Photo by Suratman (Volcanological Survey of Indonesia).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Kusumadinata K, 1979. Data Dasar Gunungapi Indonesia. Bandung: Volc Surv Indonesia, 820 p.

Morrice M G, Jezek P A, Gill J B, Whitford D J, Monoarfa M, 1983. An introduction to the Sangihe arc: volcanism accompanying arc-arc collision in the Molucca Sea, Indonesia. J Volc Geotherm Res, 19: 135-165.

Neumann van Padang M, 1951. Indonesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 1: 1-271.

Neumann van Padang M, 1959. Changes in the top of Mount Ruang (Indonesia). Geol en Mijnbouw, 21: 113-118.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano
Lava dome

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Oceanic crust (< 15 km)

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite
Basalt / Picro-Basalt

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
878
1,652
2,766
149,159

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Ruang Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.