Slamet

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  • Indonesia
  • Java
  • Stratovolcano
  • 2009 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 7.242°S
  • 109.208°E

  • 3428 m
    11244 ft

  • 263180
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

26 March-1 April 2014

PVMBG reported that during 8-14 March dense white plumes rose as high as 1.2 km above Slamet, and ash plumes rose 800-1,000 m and drifted E. Incandescence from the crater was observed at 2148 during an eruption on 14 March. Brownish-white plumes rose 2 km on 15 March and ash plumes rose 1.2 km and again drifted E. During 22-28 March white-to-gray plumes rose 1.3 km. Dense gray ash plumes rose 2 km and drifted W. White plumes were observed on 29 March. Various seismic signals including shallow volcanic earthquakes, harmonic tremor, and volcanic earthquakes fluctuated during 8-28 March. Carbon dioxide emissions significantly increased during 17-20 March. PVMBG noted that activity, based on visual and instrument monitoring, continued to fluctuate; on 29 March the Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4). Residents and tourists were warned not approach the crater within a radius of 2 km.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM



 Available Weekly Reports


2014: March
2011: July
2009: April | May | June | August | September
2007: March


26 March-1 April 2014

PVMBG reported that during 8-14 March dense white plumes rose as high as 1.2 km above Slamet, and ash plumes rose 800-1,000 m and drifted E. Incandescence from the crater was observed at 2148 during an eruption on 14 March. Brownish-white plumes rose 2 km on 15 March and ash plumes rose 1.2 km and again drifted E. During 22-28 March white-to-gray plumes rose 1.3 km. Dense gray ash plumes rose 2 km and drifted W. White plumes were observed on 29 March. Various seismic signals including shallow volcanic earthquakes, harmonic tremor, and volcanic earthquakes fluctuated during 8-28 March. Carbon dioxide emissions significantly increased during 17-20 March. PVMBG noted that activity, based on visual and instrument monitoring, continued to fluctuate; on 29 March the Alert Level remained at 2 (on a scale of 1-4). Residents and tourists were warned not approach the crater within a radius of 2 km.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


5 March-11 March 2014

PVMBG reported that seismicity at Slamet increased during 1-10 March, particularly during 8-10 March. Observers at a post in Slamet Gambuhan village, about 10 km away, noted that diffuse to dense white plumes rose as high as 600 m above the crater during 1-7 March, and as high as 1 km during 8-10 March. The Alert Level was raised to 2 (on a scale of 1-4) on 10 March; visitors and tourists were advised not to approach the crater within a radius of 2 km.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


6 July-12 July 2011

CVGHM reported that between 6 September 2009 and July 2011 eruptions from Slamet had been absent and plumes (likely steam) rose as high as 500 m above the crater. Seismicity and the temperature of hot water from springs both decreased. On 11 July, the Alert Level was lowered to 1 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


9 September-15 September 2009

The Darwin VAAC reported that on 12 September a low-level ash plume from Slamet was observed by a pilot. Ash was not identified on satellite imagery.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


5 August-11 August 2009

Based on a pilot observation, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 8 August an ash plume from Slamet rose 90 m above the summit. Ash was not detected in satellite imagery.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


24 June-30 June 2009

CVGHM reported that during 8-28 June tephra was ejected 50-700 m above Slamet's crater and incandescent material was ejected 50-300 m above the crater. Booming noises were reported. During 23-29 June, incandescence and ash emissions were not observed. On 29 June, CVGHM lowered the Alert Level for Slamet to 2 (on a scale of 1-4) because of decreased seismicity and emissions.

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


3 June-9 June 2009

CVGHM reported that during 26 May-4 June activity from Slamet fluctuated, but decreased overall. The number of earthquakes and the temperature of water in areas around the volcano were lower. Inflation and deflation fluctuated within a range of 2 cm. White plumes rose 100-750 high. During 5-7 June, activity was characterized by inflation and an increased number of earthquakes. During that time, white plumes were accompanied by ash emissions that rose 200-800 m from the crater, incandescent material was ejected 50-200 m above the crater, and booming noises were reported. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


27 May-2 June 2009

Based on ground information from CVGHM, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 27 May an ash plume from Slamet rose to an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. Analysis of satellite imagery indicated that a possible plume rose to an altitude of 6.1 km (20,000 ft) a.s.l., but ash was not conclusively detected.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


20 May-26 May 2009

On 26 May, CVGHM reported that since 21 April seismicity from Slamet continued to increase or remain elevated; the peak of activity was on 17 May. White-to-brown "eruption smoke" rose about 800 m above the crater and inflation was detected. Ashfall was detected in areas 5-9 km away. The temperature of water in several locations on the flanks increased. During 12 and 21-23 May, lava fountains rose 100-400 m above the crater rim. White-to-gray "smoke" rose 150 m above the crater and ejected incandescent material onto the W flank. On 22 May, ashfall was reported in Sawangan village, 5 km W. On 23 May, an ash plume rose 1 km above the crater and ash fell on the N flank. Ash accumulated to1 mm near the observation post. The next day, an ash plume rose 700 m above the crater. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


29 April-5 May 2009

During 23 April-5 May, CVGHM reported that seismicity from Slamet increased and an eruption originating from the western part of the crater continued. During times of clear weather, observers reported that incandescent lava, ejected 25-100 m above the crater, fell back into and around the active crater. Gray and white "smoke" rose 100-800 m from the crater. Occasionally a "thunderous" noise accompanied eruptions of ash. The Alert Level remained at 3 (on a scale of 1-4).

Source: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM


22 April-28 April 2009

CVGHM reported that seismicity from Slamet increased during 19-23 April. Diffuse white plumes rose about 50 m above the crater on 20 April. During 21-23 April, white and white-to-brownish plumes rose 50-800 m above the crater. On 23 April, the Alert Level was raised to 3 (on a scale of 1-4); people were advised not to climb the summit. According to a news article, a CVGHM volcanologist stated that lava was ejected 600 m high and ash bursts up to 112 times within a 6-hour period were detected.

Sources: Pusat Vulkanologi dan Mitigasi Bencana Geologi (PVMBG) also known CVGHM, Jakarta Globe


28 March-3 April 2007

According to a news article, a volcano observer monitoring Slamet reported on 1 April that plume activity had increased in intensity and frequency over the previous two weeks. Plumes rose to an estimated altitude of 3.8 km (12,500 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Earth Times


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2009 Apr 21 2009 Jun 22 (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
[ 2000 Jul (?) ] [ 2000 Oct (?) ] Uncertain 1  
1999 May 1 (?) 1999 Sep (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1988 Jul 12 1988 Jul 13 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
[ 1974 May 29 ] [ 1974 May 29 ] Uncertain 2  
1973 Aug Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1969 Jun 23 1969 Aug Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1967 May 7 1967 Jul Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1966 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1960 Dec 1961 Jan Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1958 Sep 13 1958 Nov 5 ± 4 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1958 Apr 17 1958 May 7 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1957 Feb 8 1957 Feb 8 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1955 Nov 12 1955 Dec 20 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1953 Aug 1953 Oct Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1951 Jun 26 1952 Jan 1 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1951 Feb 11 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1948 Nov 14 1948 Dec 15 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1944 May 9 1944 Oct 30 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1943 Oct 2 1944 Jan 5 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1943 Mar 18 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1940 Mar 15 1940 Apr 15 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1939 Dec 4 1939 Dec 4 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1939 Mar 29 1939 Jul 15 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1937 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
[ 1934 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1933 May 12 1933 May 13 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1932 Jul 1 1932 Sep 10 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1930 Apr 2 1930 Apr 13 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1929 Jun 6 1929 Jun 15 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1928 Mar 20 1928 May 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1927 Feb 27 1927 Feb 27 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1926 Nov 23 ± 1 days 1926 Nov 30 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1923 Jun 2 1923 Jun 2 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1904 Jul 14 1904 Aug 9 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1890 Aug 6 1890 Aug 29 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1885 Mar 21 1885 Mar 30 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1875 Nov 2 ± 2 days 1875 Dec 26 ± 5 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1875 May 29 (in or before) 1875 Jun 4 ± 4 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1860 Mar 19 1860 Apr 11 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1849 Dec 1 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1847 Mar 20 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1835 Sep 1835 Sep Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1825 Oct Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1772 Aug 11 1772 Aug 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Kusumadinata K, 1979. Data Dasar Gunungapi Indonesia. Bandung: Volc Surv Indonesia, 820 p.

Neumann van Padang M, 1951. Indonesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 1: 1-271.

Reubi O, Nicholls I A, Kamenetsky V S , 2003. Early mixing and mingling in the evolution of basaltic magmas: evidence from phenocryst assemblages, Slamet Volcano, Java, Indonesia. J Volc Geotherm Res, 119: 225-274.

Sutawidjaja I S, Aswin D, Sitorus K, 1985. Geologic map of Slamet volcano, Central Java. Volc Surv Indonesia, 1:50,000 geol map.

Taverne N J M, 1926. Vulkanstudien op Java. Vulk Meded, 7: 1-132.

Vukadinovic D, Nichols I A, 1989. The petrogenesis of island arc basalts from Gunung Slamet volcano, Indonesia: trace element and 87Sr/86Sr constraints. Geochim Cosmochim Acta, 53: 2349-2363.

Slamet, Java's second highest volcano at 3428 m and one of its most active, has a cluster of about three dozen cinder cones on its lower SE-NE flanks and a single cinder cone on the western flank. Slamet is composed of two overlapping edifices, an older basaltic-andesite to andesitic volcano on the west and a younger basaltic to basaltic-andesite one on the east. Gunung Malang II cinder cone on the upper eastern flank on the younger edifice fed a lava flow that extends 6 km to the east. Four craters occur at the summit of Gunung Slamet, with activity migrating to the SW over time. Historical eruptions, recorded since the 18th century, have originated from a 150-m-deep, 450-m-wide, steep-walled crater at the western part of the summit and have consisted of explosive eruptions generally lasting a few days to a few weeks.