Suoh

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  • Indonesia
  • Sumatra
  • Caldera(s)
  • 1933 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 5.25°S
  • 104.27°E

  • 1000 m
    3280 ft

  • 261270
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Suoh.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Suoh.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1933 Jul 10 1933 Aug 5 Confirmed 4 Historical Observations Pematang Bata

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Bellier O, Bellon H, Sebrier M, Sutanto, Maury R C, 1999. K-Ar age of the Ranau Tuffs: implications for the Ranau caldera emplacement and slip-partitioning in Sumatra (Indonesia). Tectonophysics, 312: 347-359.

Neumann van Padang M, 1951. Indonesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 1: 1-271.

Newhall C G, Dzurisin D, 1988. Historical unrest at large calderas of the world. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1855: 1108 p, 2 vol.

Smithsonian Institution-GVN, 1990-. [Monthly event reports]. Bull Global Volc Network, v 15-33.

The 8 x 16 km Suoh (or Suwoh) depression appears to have a dominantly tectonic origin, but contains a smaller complex of overlapping calderas oriented NNE-SSW. Historically active maars and silicic domes lie along the margins of the depression, which lies along the Great Sumatran Fault that extends the length of the island. Numerous hot springs occur along faults within the depression, which contains the Pematang Bata fumarole field. Large phreatic explosions (0.2 cu km tephra) occurred at the time of a major tectonic earthquake in 1933. Very minor hydrothermal explosions produced two 5-m-wide craters at the time of a February 1994 earthquake.