Patah

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  • Indonesia
  • Indonesia
  • Stratovolcano?
  • Unknown - Unrest / Holocene
  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 4.27°S
  • 103.3°E

  • 2817 m
    9240 ft

  • 261231
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: September 1989 (SEAN 14:09)


Photos and more precise location

Savill's photograph (figure 1) shows a fresh-appearing feature emitting two small gas plumes in an otherwise heavily forested area. Careful comparison of his panoramic view of the region (figure 2) with maps at scales of 1:250,000 (Manna quadrangle, BAKOSURTANAL, 1986) and 1:500,000 (Tactical Pilotage Chart M-10CG, British Military Survey, 1971) places the crater ~8 km WNW of the position given in 14:5. Map data indicate that vent's revised position is at ~2,300 m altitude, roughly 6 km SSE of the summit of Gunung Patah (Zen, 1973). Savill reports that clouds have prevented observations of the vent during subsequent overflights.

Figure 1. Oblique airphoto taken 1 May 1989 showing an apparent new vent in S Sumatra SE of Patah. A pair of gas plumes emerge from the bottom of the feature, which he estimated to be about 150 m across. A light-colored unvegetated zone appears to extend just over the vent rim and a short distance down a narrow valley that drains the lowest portion of the vent. Photograph by Michael Savill.
Figure 2. Panoramic oblique airphoto taken 1 May 1989. Annotations show the photo's orientation, the approximate location of the vent SE of Patah, and Dempo volcano, a prominent cone roughly 40 km to the NW. Photograph by Michael Savill.

Information Contacts: M. Savill, Worthing, UK.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Patah.

Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

05/1989 (SEAN 14:05) Overflight shows gas emission from 150-m crater

09/1989 (SEAN 14:09) Photos and more precise location




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


05/1989 (SEAN 14:05) Overflight shows gas emission from 150-m crater

On 1 May, M.S. Savill, pilot of a British cargo aircraft, photographed an apparent new crater in rugged, heavily forested terrain at ~2,500 m altitude [around 4.30°S, 103.32°E, ~6 km SE of Patah]. The crater was described as a smoking feature ~150 m across on a ridge that is usually obscured by clouds. There was no evidence of a lava flow. VSI reported no observations of activity in the area.

The reported location of the new vent is ~7 km W of Bukit Ringgit II (Zen, 1973), and ~25 km W of Marga Bayur, which had a small phreatic eruption in 1940 [but see 14:9]. Dempo, ~45 km to the NW, has erupted more than 20 times since the early 19th century. The Tanjung Sakti hot springs and fumarole fields, on the S flank ~10 km from Dempo's summit, include six hot/boiling springs that emit white fume at temperatures ranging from 95°C to boiling.

References. Zen, M.T., 1973, IAVCEI Data Sheets of the Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World.

Information Contacts: I. Gass, Open Univ; VSI.
Download or Cite this Report

09/1989 (SEAN 14:09) Photos and more precise location

Savill's photograph (figure 1) shows a fresh-appearing feature emitting two small gas plumes in an otherwise heavily forested area. Careful comparison of his panoramic view of the region (figure 2) with maps at scales of 1:250,000 (Manna quadrangle, BAKOSURTANAL, 1986) and 1:500,000 (Tactical Pilotage Chart M-10CG, British Military Survey, 1971) places the crater ~8 km WNW of the position given in 14:5. Map data indicate that vent's revised position is at ~2,300 m altitude, roughly 6 km SSE of the summit of Gunung Patah (Zen, 1973). Savill reports that clouds have prevented observations of the vent during subsequent overflights.

Figure 1. Oblique airphoto taken 1 May 1989 showing an apparent new vent in S Sumatra SE of Patah. A pair of gas plumes emerge from the bottom of the feature, which he estimated to be about 150 m across. A light-colored unvegetated zone appears to extend just over the vent rim and a short distance down a narrow valley that drains the lowest portion of the vent. Photograph by Michael Savill.
Figure 2. Panoramic oblique airphoto taken 1 May 1989. Annotations show the photo's orientation, the approximate location of the vent SE of Patah, and Dempo volcano, a prominent cone roughly 40 km to the NW. Photograph by Michael Savill.

Information Contacts: M. Savill, Worthing, UK.
Download or Cite this Report

Patah is a heavily forested, dissected Quaternary volcano SE of Dempo volcano. The age of its latest eruptions is not known, although on 1 May 1989 a possible new crater with active fumaroles was observed by a cargo aircraft pilot in a heavily forested area about 6 km SE of the summit of Gunung Patah, near Bukit Baturigis (about 4 deg 18 min S, 103 deg 19 min E). The exact location of the 150-m-wide crater, date of its formation, and its geologic relationship to nearby Patah volcano are uncertain. Another vent containing a crater lake is located 1 km to the south.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Patah. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Patah page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The Global Volcanism Program has no synonyms or subfeatures listed for Patah.

Gunung Patah is a densely forested, dissected Quaternary volcano SE of Dempo volcano (upper right). The location of a possible new crater first observed in 1989 about 6 km SE of the summit is shown by an arrow in this photo.

Photo by Michael Savill, 1989.
A possible new crater about 6 km SE of the summit of Patah volcano was observed by the pilot of a British cargo aircraft in 1989 in an area commonly obscured by clouds. Two steam plumes were observed rising from the 150-m-wide crater.

Photo by Michael Savill, 1989.
Gunung Patah is a densely forested, dissected Quaternary volcano SE of Dempo volcano. The age of its latest eruptions is not known, although a possible new crater (the light-colored area in the center of this photo) was observed in 1989 about 6 km SE of the summit of Patah volcano. Another vent containing a crater lake is visible 1 km to the south.

Photo by Michael Savill, 1989.

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Smithsonian Institution-SEAN, 1975-89. [Monthly event reports]. Bull Scientific Event Alert Network (SEAN), v 1-14.

Volcano Types

Stratovolcano?

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Rock Types

Major
No Data (checked)

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
47
214
64,024
1,302,916

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Patah Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.