Eastern Gemini Seamount

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 20.98°S
  • 170.28°E

  • -80 m
    -262 ft

  • 258001
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Eastern Gemini Seamount.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Eastern Gemini Seamount.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1996 Feb 18 1996 Feb 22 (in or after) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Arculus R J, Shipboard Scientists, 2006. Coriolis Troughs and southern New Hebrides arc: primary tectonic results from the CoTroVE (SS06/2004) research voyage. AESC2006, Melbourne, Australia, 5 p.

Monzier M, Danyushevsky L V, Crawford A J, Bellon H, Cotton J, 1993. High-Mg andesites from the southern termination of the New Hebrides island arc (SW Pacific). J Volc Geotherm Res, 57: 193-217.

Smithsonian Institution-GVN, 1990-. [Monthly event reports]. Bull Global Volc Network, v 15-33.

A submarine eruption, the first recorded in historical time from this previously little known seamount, was observed by a passing ship on February 18, 1996. Water discoloration and bursts of very dark water were observed at Eastern Gemini. Overflights as late as the 22nd noted periodic explosions that ejected black products to about 20 m above sea level. Located ~100 km south of Aneityum Island, about halfway between Yasur volcano and Matthew Island, the Eastern Gemini seamount, also known as Oscostar, is one of several seamounts along the southern submarine extension of the New Hebrides island arc. It consists of an elongated NNE-SSW-trending ridge of submarine volcanoes with satellitic cones. Several basaltic samples and one andesitic rock dredged from this seamount in 1989 were described as glassy, vesicular, and extremely fresh.