Lopevi

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Vanuatu
  • Vanuatu
  • Stratovolcano
  • 2007 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 16.507°S
  • 168.346°E

  • 1413 m
    4635 ft

  • 257050
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

20 February-26 February 2008

Based on a pilot report, the Wellington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Lopevi rose to an altitude of below 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 24 February. [Correction: The Wellington VAAC described a gray plume, not an ash plume.]

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)



 Available Weekly Reports


2008: February
2007: April | May
2006: January | May | July
2003: June
2001: June


20 February-26 February 2008

Based on a pilot report, the Wellington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Lopevi rose to an altitude of below 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 24 February. [Correction: The Wellington VAAC described a gray plume, not an ash plume.]

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


2 May-8 May 2007

Based on a pilot report, the Wellington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Lopevi rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. on 3 May.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 April-1 May 2007

Based on a pilot report, the Wellington VAAC reported that an ash plume from Lopevi covered the vent on 25 April. The altitude of the plume was not reported.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 April-24 April 2007

Based on pilot reports and satellite imagery, the Wellington VAAC reported that ash plumes from Lopevi rose to altitudes of 2.4-4.6 km (8,000-15,000 ft) a.s.l. during 21-24 April. Plumes drifted E on 21 April.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


5 July-11 July 2006

Based on pilot reports, the Wellington VAAC reported that an eruption plume from Lopevi on 5 July reached an unknown altitude and smoke-and-ash plumes on 8 and 9 July reached altitudes of 3.7 km (12,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted E and SE, respectively.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


17 May-23 May 2006

According to Vanuatu's National Disaster Management Office, Lopevi volcano remains at Alert Level 2. An official spokesperson reported no new ashfall during 17-22 May. The last report of an ash plume was on 15 May.

Source: Shanghai Daily


10 May-16 May 2006

The Wellington VAAC reported that a slow moving plume from Lopevi reached a height of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 10 May. On 11 May, a plume rose to 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and trended SE. During 12-13 May, the plume height lessened to 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. as the eruption vigor reportedly decreased. According to Vanuatu's National Disaster Office, a news article reported that on 15 May an eruption at Lopevi produced heavy ashfall extending to the neighboring islands of Ambrym and Paama.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


3 May-9 May 2006

Based on information from a pilot report, the Wellington VAAC reported that on 7 May a small ash plume from Lopevi was visible below a height of ~3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and an active lava flow was observed at the volcano.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


25 January-31 January 2006

Following reports of plumes from Lopevi reaching heights of ~2.7 km (9,000 ft) a.s.l. on 24 and 25 January, the Wellington VAAC reported that plumes of "smoke" rose to ~2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. on 26 January and drifted S. They also reported that lava flowed down the S flank of the volcano on the 26th.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


18 January-24 January 2006

Pilots reported a vertical plume rising from Lopevi on 24 January 2006 to an altitude of 2.1-2.4 km (7,000-8,000 feet) a.s.l. The plume extended S and SE, and was reportedly at 2.7 km (9,000 feet) a.s.l. about 24 hours later.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


11 June-17 June 2003

The eruption that began at Lopevi on 9 June continued through at least 14 June. An airport in Vanuatu reported to the Wellington VAAC that a thick plume rose to ~7.5 km a.s.l. on 11 June. The plume drifted SE and was ~9 km in diameter. They reported that on 13 June a ~9-km-diameter plume rose to ~2.5 km a.s.l. Also, on 14 June an ash cloud was at a height of ~2.5 km a.s.l. and a thin lava flow was visible on the volcano's W flank. A news article stated that the eruption of Lopevi was causing acid rain to fall on island villages in Vanuatu that are close to the volcano. Local disaster management personnel warned residents of the islands of Paama, Epi, and villages in SE Ambryn to secure their rain-based water supplies.

Sources: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), ABC News - Australian Broadcasting Corporation


4 June-10 June 2003

Based on information from an airport in Vanuatu, the Wellington VAAC reported that a thick ash cloud emitted from Lopevi was observed on 8 June at 1155 rising higher than 12 km a.s.l. and drifting SE. The plume was not visible on satellite imagery. A report from an aircraft revealed that on 9 June at 1011 there was no indication of an ash cloud near Lopevi. That day at 1430 the airport reported that a ~18.5-km-wide, thick black ash cloud was visible rising to ~2.7 km a.s.l. and drifting SE.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


13 June-19 June 2001

Based on a pilot report, the Wellington VAAC issued an ash advisory stating that at 0302 on 14 June a small eruption produced an ash cloud that rose up to ~1.8 km a.s.l. The cloud expanded towards the N over the islands of Paama and Ambrym.

Source: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC)


6 June-12 June 2001

According to the Wellington VAAC an eruption at Lopevi that began on 8 June at 1250 produced an ash cloud that rose at least 6 km a.s.l. and drifted to the WNW. The ash cloud was clearly visible on enhanced satellite imagery for many hours. According to news reports, more than 0.9 m of ash was deposited on the uninhabited island of Lopevi and several inches covered the neighboring island of Paama. As a result, on Paama the ~1,600 resident's water supply was contaminated (open water sources tested around 12 June showed a PH value of 3) and the crops were severely damaged by ash and gas from the eruptions. There were no reports of injuries, but the National Disaster Management Office project officer, Barton Bisiwei, stated that hundreds of people on Paama suffered from throat, chest, and lung problems as a result of breathing ash and gas. Smaller amounts of ash also fell on the islands of Ambrym, Malekula, and Epi. The UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported that the heavy ash fall in Paama had almost ceased by 12 June, but strong Southeasterly Trade Winds (10-15 knots) continued to spread the ash. A government spokesperson stated that as of 13 June no evacuations had been ordered.

Sources: Wellington Volcanic Ash Advisory Center (VAAC), UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), Société Volcanologique Européenne, Associated Press, Reuters


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
[ 2008 Feb 24 ] [ 2008 Feb 24 (?) ] Uncertain 2  
2007 Apr 21 2007 May 14 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2005 Oct 27 (?) 2006 Aug 1 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2005 Jan 30 2005 Mar 31 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2004 Sep 2004 Sep Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2003 Jun 8 2003 Jun 16 (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
2001 Jun 8 2001 Jun 19 (in or after) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations NW flank (200-400 m)
1998 Jul 2000 Apr 25 (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations 1963 crater (NW flank 1000 m)
1982 Oct 24 1982 Oct 25 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1980 Apr 15 1980 Aug 20 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Summit, NW and SE flanks
1979 Jul 2 1979 Sep 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW flank
1978 Nov 22 1979 Mar Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit and NW flank
1976 May 1 1976 Sep 5 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1975 Mar 6 ± 3 days 1975 Jun 23 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit and NW flank
1974 Jan 1974 Oct 7 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit and NW flank
1970 May 9 1972 Aug 7 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit, NW and east flanks
1967 Jan 27 1969 Mar 31 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Summit and NW flank
1963 Jul 7 1965 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Summit, NW, north, east and SE flanks
1962 Jul 1962 Jul (?) Confirmed 0 Historical Observations NW flank
1960 Jul 10 1960 Sep Confirmed 3 Historical Observations NW flank (640 m)
1939 Nov 1 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW and/or SW flanks
1939 Feb 2 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NW and SE flanks
1933 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1922 Jun 28 1922 Jul 1 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1908 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1898 Jun 3 1898 Jul 24 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1892 Oct 1893 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1883 1884 Confirmed   Historical Observations
1874 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1864 Jun 9 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1863 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Atkin J, 1868. On volcanoes in the New Hebrides and Bank's Islands. Proc Geol Soc London, 24: 305-307.

Eissen J-P, Blot C, Louat R, 1991. Chronologie de l'activite volcanique historique de l'arc insulaire des Nouvelles-Hebrides de 1595 a 1991. ORSTOM Rapports Sci Tech Sci Terre Geol-Geophys, 2: 1-69.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

New Hebrides Geological Survey, 1972. Geology of the Central Islands. New Hebrides Geol Surv, 1:100,000 geol map sheet 8.

Priam R, Charley D, Lardy M, 1999. Lopevi--resume de l'activite historieque et de l'activite recente. L'Assoc Volc Europeenne (LAVE), 77: 11-13.

Robin C, Monzier M, Crawford A J, Eggins S M, 1993. The geology, volcanology, petrology-geochemistry, and tectonic evolution of the New Hebrides island arc, Vanuatu. IAVCEI Canberra 1993 excursion guide, Aust Geol Surv Org, Rec 1993/59, 86 p.

Williams C E F, Warden A J, 1964. Progress Report of the Geological Survey for the Period 1959-1962. New Hebrides: British Service, 75 p.

The small 7-km-wide conical island of Lopevi, known locally as Vanei Vollohulu, is one of Vanuatu's most active volcanoes. A small summit crater containing a cinder cone is breached to the NW and tops an older cone that is rimmed by the remnant of a larger crater. The basaltic-to-andesitic volcano has been active during historical time at both summit and flank vents, primarily along a NW-SE-trending fissure that cuts across the island, producing moderate explosive eruptions and lava flows that reached the coast. Historical eruptions at the 1413-m-high volcano date back to the mid-19th century. The island was evacuated following major eruptions in 1939 and 1960. The latter eruption, from a NW-flank fissure vent, produced a pyroclastic flow that swept to the sea and a lava flow that formed a new peninsula on the western coast.