Tinakula

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 10.38°S
  • 165.8°E

  • 851 m
    2791 ft

  • 256010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

15 February-21 February 2012

According to NASA's Earth Observatory, thermal anomalies from Tinakula were detected in satellite data during 13-14 February and a gas plume with possible ash content rose from the volcano on 14 February.

Source: NASA Earth Observatory



 Available Weekly Reports


2012: February


15 February-21 February 2012

According to NASA's Earth Observatory, thermal anomalies from Tinakula were detected in satellite data during 13-14 February and a gas plume with possible ash content rose from the volcano on 14 February.

Source: NASA Earth Observatory


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2008 Sep 19 (?) 2012 Oct 23 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2006 Feb (in or before) 2007 Nov (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 2002 Nov ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 1  
2002 Apr Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations Upper NW flank
2000 Nov 2 (?) 2001 Apr 16 (?) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1999 May Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1995 Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1989 Aug (in or before) 1990 Feb (in or after) Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1984 Jun 3 (in or before) 1985 Jun 13 (in or after) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Upper NW flank
1971 Sep 6 1971 Dec 11 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Upper and lower NW flanks
1965 Nov 23 1966 Jun 11 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Upper NW flank
[ 1955 Aug ] [ 1955 Oct 15 ± 60 days ] Uncertain 2  
1951 Oct 23 1951 Nov 27 ± 30 days Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1909 Aug Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1897 Mar 26 ± 5 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1886 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1871 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1869 Mar Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1857 Aug Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1855 Aug Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1840 (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1797 Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1768 Aug Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1595 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

Hughes G W, Craig P M, Dennis R A, 1981. Geology of the eastern Outer Islands. Solomon Is Geol Surv Bull, 4: 1-33.

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

The small 3.5-km-wide island of Tinakula is the exposed summit of a massive stratovolcano that rises 3-4 km from the sea floor at the NW end of the Santa Cruz islands. Tinakula resembles Stromboli volcano in containing a breached summit crater that extends from the 851-m-high summit to below sea level. Landslides enlarged this scarp in 1965, creating an embayment on the NW coast. The satellitic cone of Mendana is located on the SE side. The dominantly andesitic Tinakula volcano has frequently been observed in eruption since the era of Spanish exploration began in 1595. In about 1840, an explosive eruption apparently produced pyroclastic flows that swept all sides of the island, killing its inhabitants. Frequent historical eruptions have originated from a cone constructed within the large breached crater. These have left the upper flanks of the volcano and the steep apron of lava flows and volcaniclastic debris within the breach unvegetated.