Unnamed

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 8.92°S
  • 158.03°E

  • -240 m
    -787 ft

  • 255061
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Unnamed.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Unnamed.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Unnamed. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Exon N F, Johnson R W, 1986. The elusive Cook volcano and other submarine forearc volcanoes in the Solomon Islands. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys J, 10: 77-83.

Okrugin V M, 1985. Information note on the results of the 7th cruise of the R/V 'Vulcanolog' in the vicinity of the Solomon Islands. Solomon Is Geol Div File Rpt, unpublished rpt.

An E-W-trending chain of seamounts is located immediately north of Kavachi submarine volcano. The westernmost seamount, located 7 km NW of Kavachi, is the largest, and has a flat-topped summit that extended to within 70-m of the sea surface during a 1979 bathymetric survey. Its summit is covered with calcareous rocks and is fringed by a reef, but thermal plumes were detected in 1992 from one of its two summit craters. The central seamount to the east is lower and reaches to within 450 m of the sea surface. The summit of the easternmost seamount, 9-km NE of Kavachi, lies 240-m beneath the ocean surface. This unnamed andesitic seamount appears to have been formed by relatively recent eruptions.