Loloru

Photo of this volcano
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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 6.52°S
  • 155.62°E

  • 1887 m
    6189 ft

  • 255030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

Most Recent Bulletin Report: August 1995 (BGVN 20:08)


Weak to moderate steaming, but sublimate deposits in possible decline

An aerial inspection took place after the 16 August, M 7.8 earthquake 200 km to the NW. Weak-to-moderate, white vapor emissions were observed from the main fumarole field in a valley on the N flank of the summit lava dome. Sublimate deposits in the valley appeared to be less extensive than when last inspected in 1989. The lake at Loloru's summit appeared normal. There was no discoloration of lake water and the level of water appeared to be unchanged.

Information Contacts: Patrice de Saint-Ours and Ben Talai, RVO.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Loloru.

Index of Bulletin Reports


Reports are organized chronologically and indexed below by Month/Year (Publication Volume:Number), and include a one-line summary. Click on the index link or scroll down to read the reports.

10/1984 (SEAN 09:10) Solfataras active on dome and flank

04/1988 (SEAN 13:04) Higher fumarole temperature; sulfur ejected

08/1995 (BGVN 20:08) Weak to moderate steaming, but sublimate deposits in possible decline




Bulletin Reports

All information contained in these reports is preliminary and subject to change.


10/1984 (SEAN 09:10) Solfataras active on dome and flank

"Aerial inspection showed that dome and flank solfataras were active as normal. Water temperature most recently recorded in a pool by the stream draining the caldera lake was 80°C."

Information Contacts: K. McCue, Bougainville Copper Ltd.

04/1988 (SEAN 13:04) Higher fumarole temperature; sulfur ejected

"The main thermal area on the middle NE flank of the dome was visited on 25 April. A temperature of 108°C was measured at the main fumarole, which was surrounded by a mound of sulphur ~1 m high. Measurements since 1964 had obtained maximum temperatures of 93-97°C. Emissions from this fumarole formed a column up to 20 m high, and were accompanied by a low roaring sound. Both H2S and SO2 were detected, and occasional droplets of molten sulphur were ejected."

Information Contacts: D. Lolok, C. McKee, and B. Talai, RVO.

08/1995 (BGVN 20:08) Weak to moderate steaming, but sublimate deposits in possible decline

An aerial inspection took place after the 16 August, M 7.8 earthquake 200 km to the NW. Weak-to-moderate, white vapor emissions were observed from the main fumarole field in a valley on the N flank of the summit lava dome. Sublimate deposits in the valley appeared to be less extensive than when last inspected in 1989. The lake at Loloru's summit appeared normal. There was no discoloration of lake water and the level of water appeared to be unchanged.

Information Contacts: Patrice de Saint-Ours and Ben Talai, RVO.

Loloru, the SE-most volcano on Bougainville Island, is the source of a broad ignimbrite apron that covers much of the southern part of the island. The summit consists of two nested calderas, and a forested andesitic lava dome that restricts a crescent-shaped lake to the eastern side of the younger caldera. The smooth flanks of the pyroclastic shield are dissected by radiating deep valleys. A pristine lava flow occurs on the SE flank. Loloru is constructed within the 10 x 15 km Pleistocene Laluai caldera. The topographically higher Taroka group of volcanoes to the NW and the Takuan group to the north also were constructed within the caldera and served to deflect the bulk of Loloru ignimbrites to the south. The most recent of several major Holocene explosive eruptions at Loloru took place about 3000 years ago.

Summary of Holocene eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
1260 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
2150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
3150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
4150 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)
6950 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed   Radiocarbon (uncorrected)

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.


Synonyms

Lolaru

Cones

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Taroka Group Cone 2219 m 5° 29' 0" S 155° 35' 0" E

Craters

Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Laluai Pleistocene caldera 6° 28' 0" S 155° 36' 0" E
The summit of Loloru volcano on SE Bougainville Island is truncated by two nested calderas. A forested lava dome restricts a crescent-shaped lake to the eastern side of the younger caldera. Loloru is constructed within the 10 x 15 km Pleistocene Laluai caldera; part of the rim of this outer caldera is seen at the lower right. Pyroclastic flows from the volcano cover much of the southern part of the island. The most recent of several major Holocene explosive eruptions at Loloru took place about 3000 years ago.

Photo by Wally Johnson, 1988 (Australia Bureau of Mineral Resources).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Blake D H, Miezitis Y, 1967. Geology of Bougainville and Buka Islands, New Guinea. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Bull, 93: 1-56.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

McKee C O, Johnson R W, Patia H, 1989. Assessment of volcanic hazards on Bougainville Island, Papua New Guinea (abs). New Mexico Bur Mines Min Resour Bull, 131: 182.

McKee C O, Johnson R W, Rogerson R, 1990. Explosive volcanism on Bougainville Island: ignimbrites, calderas, and volcanic hazards. Proc Pacific Rim Cong 1990, 2: 237-245.

Rogerson R J, Hilyard D B, Finlayson E J, Johnson R W, Mckee C O, 1989. The geology and mineral resources of Bougainville and Buka Islands, Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Mem, no 16.

Volcano Types

Pyroclastic shield
Caldera(s)
Lava dome

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Crustal thickness unknown

Rock Types

Major
Andesite / Basaltic Andesite

Population

Within 5 km
Within 10 km
Within 30 km
Within 100 km
1
173
26,075
97,088

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Loloru Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.