Tore

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 5.83°S
  • 154.93°E

  • 2200 m
    7216 ft

  • 255000
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Tore.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Tore.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Tore. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Blake D H, Miezitis Y, 1967. Geology of Bougainville and Buka Islands, New Guinea. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Bull, 93: 1-56.

McKee C O, Johnson R W, Rogerson R, 1990. Explosive volcanism on Bougainville Island: ignimbrites, calderas, and volcanic hazards. Proc Pacific Rim Cong 1990, 2: 237-245.

Rogerson R J, Hilyard D B, Finlayson E J, Johnson R W, Mckee C O, 1989. The geology and mineral resources of Bougainville and Buka Islands, Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Mem, no 16.

A 6 x 9 km caldera at Tore volcano in the Emperor Range on NW Bougainville Island is the source of two Pleistocene ignimbrites that form a broad fan that extends the coastline to the west. The southern and SW sides of the caldera rim are covered by lava flows that extend up to 14 km from a large post-caldera lava cone. The summit of the andesitic volcano consists of an erosional pyramidal peak and a forested satellitic ash cone 3 km to the NW. The freshly preserved features of the post-caldera ash cone and lava cone indicate a Recent age (Blake and Miezitis, 1967).