Goodenough

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 9.48°S
  • 150.35°E

  • 220 m
    722 ft

  • 253041
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Goodenough.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Goodenough.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Goodenough. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Smith I E M, 1981. Young volcanoes in eastern Papua. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Mem, 10: 257-265.

Goodenough is a roughly circular volcanic island that is the westernmost of the D'Entrecasteaux Islands off the NE tip of Papua New Guinea. Several basaltic-andesite and andesitic Holocene eruptive centers that may be only a few hundred years old are located around the margins of fault-bounded metamorphic rocks that form the central part of Goodenough Island. The youngest volcanic features, which include the Walilagi Cones, are located at the SE end of the island. These well-developed ash cones and blocky lava flows on the northern and eastern flanks of the Bwaido Peninsula may have erupted within the past few hundred years.