Yelia

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 7.05°S
  • 145.858°E

  • 3384 m
    11100 ft

  • 253002
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Yelia.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Yelia.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Yelia. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Blong R J, 1982. The Time of Darkness Local Legends and Volcanic Reality in Papua New Guinea. Canberra: Aust Natl Univ Press, 257 p.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Johnson R W, 1987. Large-scale volcanic cone collapse: the 1888 slope failure of Ritter volcano, and other examples from Papua New Guinea. Bull Volc, 49: 669-679.

Mackenzie D E, Johnson R W, 1984. Pleistocene volcanoes of the western Papua New Guinea Highlands: morphology, geology, petrography, and modal and chemical analyses. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Rpt, 246: 1-271.

Mount Yelia, first recognized as a volcano in 1963, contains a group of andesitic lava domes in the summit area and NW flank. Marble Peak is an older volcanic center immediately to the south. The largest dome in the summit crater is perforated by at least 11 craters. Two large steep-sided, flat-topped lava domes occupy the NNE flank, and two smaller domes are located to the west. The last significant eruption occurred about 18,000 years ago, and no direct evidence for Holocene eruptions has been observed. Weak solfataric activity is present and there was an unverified report from local inhabitants of an eruption during the early 1940's. Weak fumarolic activity continues in the summit crater.