Sulu Range

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  • Papua New Guinea
  • New Britain
  • Stratovolcano(es)
  • Unknown
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 5.5°S
  • 150.942°E

  • 610 m
    2001 ft

  • 252090
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

25 October-31 October 2006

The RVO reported that during 28 September-24 October, seismic activity in the Sulu Range declined. Vapor plumes that were emitted from the Silanga Hotsprings were visible about 20 km NE from Bialla. A moderately strong sulfur smell from the Silanga and Talopu hot springs continued to be reported.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)



 Available Weekly Reports


2006: July | August | October


25 October-31 October 2006

The RVO reported that during 28 September-24 October, seismic activity in the Sulu Range declined. Vapor plumes that were emitted from the Silanga Hotsprings were visible about 20 km NE from Bialla. A moderately strong sulfur smell from the Silanga and Talopu hot springs continued to be reported.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


16 August-22 August 2006

The RVO reported that during 10-15 August, seismic activity in the Sulu Range fluctuated but remained at low levels. Epicenters of occasional high frequency earthquakes were located between the Sulu Range and the Silanga area, approximately 10 km to the SW. Vapor plumes were emitted from the Silanga Hotsprings and on 15 August an explosion was heard from Mato Hotspring.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


9 August-15 August 2006

The RVO reported that during 31 July-2 August, seismic activity at Sulu Range was at relatively low levels. Earthquakes of Modified Mercalli Intensity 1-2 in areas S were described as being more irregular and occurring at longer intervals.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


12 July-18 July 2006

The RVO reported that seismic activity from the Sulu Range continued at a high level during 13-15 July. No emissions were reported during this period. According to news reports, on 16 July disaster officials in Papua New Guinea evacuated three villages and moved 1,400 people to camps outside of the hazard zone.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Association of American Publishers


5 July-11 July 2006

On 10 July, the RVO reported that "forceful, dark emissions" from the Sulu Range were observed on 7 July and decreased to moderate emissions by the morning of 8 July. On 12 July, aerial inspection confirmed that emissions were coming from a NW-S-trending area between Ubia and Ululu volcanoes. The report also indicated that weak to moderate white vapor emissions were observed on 10 through 12 July and seismic activity had increased in intensity and frequency from 6 July. Loud booming and rumbling noises were accompanied by strong tremor picked up at stations at Garbuna and Ulawun volcanoes. On 11 July it was reported that there was no evidence of ash emission and that three villages north of Mount Karai had been evacuated. A large earthquake (intensity of ~7) occurred on 12 July at 0820 that disturbed the shoreline and caused the sea water to become sediment-laden. Local rivers turned muddy due to continuous ground shaking.

Reports of vegetation die-off from late February had not been confirmed due to lack of resources. The Sulu Range has not been active in historical times.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


There are no Holocene eruptions known for Sulu Range. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Johnson R W, 1971. Bamus volcano, Lake Hargy area, and Sulu Range, New Britain: volcanic geology and petrology. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Rec, 1971/55: 1-36.

Woodhead J D, Eggins S M, Johnson R W, 1998. Magma genesis in the New Britain island arc: further insights into melting and mass transfer processes. J Petr, 39: 1641-1668.

The Sulu Range consists of a cluster of partially overlapping small stratovolcanoes and lava domes in north-central New Britain off Bangula Bay. The 610-m Mount Malopu at the southern end forms the high point of the basaltic-to-rhyolitic complex. Kaiamu maar forms a peninsula with a small lake extending about 1 km into Bangula Bay at the NW side of the Sulu Range. The Walo hydrothermal area, consisting of solfataras and mud pots, lies on the coastal plain west of the SW base of the Sulu Range. No historical eruptions are known from the Sulu Range, although some of the cones display a relatively undissected morphology. A vigorous new fumarolic vent opened in 2006, preceded by vegetation die-off, seismicity, and dust-producing landslides.