Garove

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 4.692°S
  • 149.5°E

  • 368 m
    1207 ft

  • 252030
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Garove.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Garove.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Garove. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cooke R J S, Baldwin J T, Sprod T J, 1976. Recent volcanoes and mineralization in Papua New Guinea. 25th Internatl Geol Cong, Sydney, Excur Guide, 53: 1-30.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

Johnson R W, Arculus R J, 1978. Volcanic rocks of the Witu Islands, Papua New Guinea: the origin of magmas above the deepest part of the New Britain Benioff zone. Bull Volc, 41: 609-655.

Johnson R W, Blake D H, 1972. The Cape Hoskins area, southern Willaumez Peninsula, the Witu Islands, and associated volcanic centres, New Britain: volcanic geology and petrology. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Rec, 1972/133: 1-102.

Silver E, Day S, Ward S, Hoffmann G, Llanes P, Driscoll N, Appelgate B, Saunders S, 2009. Volcano collapse and tsunami generation in the Bismarck Volcanic Arc, Papua New Guinea. J Volc Geotherm Res, 186: 210-222.

Garove is the largest of the Witu Islands, which lie north of New Britain. The low, 12-km-wide elongated island is cut by a 5-km-wide caldera that is flooded by the sea through a narrow breach on the southern side of the island, forming Johann Albrecht harbor. The steep-sided caldera walls rise 100-150 m above the sea. Satellitic cones were constructed along the NE and SW coasts. No historical eruptions are known from Garove, but the preservation of fresh lava flow structures on the NW coast suggests an age as young as a few hundred years (Johnson and Blake, 1972).