Langila

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 5.525°S
  • 148.42°E

  • 1330 m
    4362 ft

  • 252010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

5 December-11 December 2012

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that an ash plume from Langila rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 110 km NW on 5 December. Elevated sulfur dioxide concentrations were also detected.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)



 Available Weekly Reports


2012: November | December
2009: September
2007: January | February | March | May | June | July | September | October
2006: January | March | August | October | November | December
2005: April | May | June | August | September | October | November
2004: December
2002: July


5 December-11 December 2012

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that an ash plume from Langila rose to an altitude of 2.1 km (7,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 110 km NW on 5 December. Elevated sulfur dioxide concentrations were also detected.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


28 November-4 December 2012

According to the Darwin VAAC, an ash plume at an altitude of 1.5 km (5,000 ft) a.s.l. was observed by a pilot on 1 December. Ash was not detected in satellite imagery.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


30 September-6 October 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 30 September an ash plume from Langila drifted 260 km NW at an altitude of 4.3 km (14,000 ft) a.s.l. On 5 October, a diffuse ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 185 km N.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


23 September-29 September 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 29 September an ash plume from Langila rose to altitudes of 2.4-4.3 km (8,000-14,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 75-220 km NW.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


9 September-15 September 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 12 September an ash plume from Langila rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 35 km W.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


10 October-16 October 2007

RVO reported that emission of ash and white vapor plumes from Langila's Crater 2 continued during 1-16 October. Plumes rose to altitudes of 1.8-2.8 km (5,900-9,200 ft) a.s.l. and drifted WNW. The emissions were occasionally accompanied by roaring noises. Crater 3 was quiet.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


26 September-2 October 2007

RVO reported that emission of ash and white vapor plumes from Langila's Crater 2 continued during 1 August-30 September. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 1.8-3.3 km (5,900-10,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted WNW. The ash emissions were occasionally accompanied by roaring and booming noises. On 8 August, a large explosion produced an ash plume that rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SW. Ashfall was reported in areas downwind. Incandescent fragments were ejected from the summit on 21 and 22 September. Crater 3 was quiet.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


11 July-17 July 2007

RVO reported that emission of ash plumes from Langila's Crater 2 continued during 6-7 and 9-13 July. Ash plumes rose to an altitude less than 2.3 km (7,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and NW. Crater 3 was quiet.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


4 July-10 July 2007

RVO reported that emission of ash plumes from Langila's Crater 2 continued during 10 June-3 July and were occasionally forceful. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 2.3-3.3 km (7,500-10,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N and NW. Crater 3 was quiet.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


6 June-12 June 2007

RVO reported that the emission of ash plumes from Langila's Crater 2 continued during 1-10 June and were occasionally forceful. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 2.3-4.3 km (7,500-14,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NNW. Ashfall was reported at Kilenge Catholic Mission (about 10 km NW of the volcano) and surrounding areas. The emissions were continuous on 6, 7, and 10 June and accompanied by roaring noises. Booming noises were heard on 1 and 10 June. Crater 3 was quiet.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


30 May-5 June 2007

RVO reported that the emission of ash clouds from Langila's Crater 2 continued during 22 May-1 June and were occasionally accompanied by roaring noises. Two large explosions on 30 May produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 5.3 km (17,400 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW. Ash plumes rose to altitudes of 3.3-4.3 km (10,800-14,100 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NW during 22 May-1 June. Ashfall was reported from Kilenge Catholic Mission (about 10 km NW of the volcano) and surrounding areas during the last few days of May and 1 June. Incandescence was visible on 29 and 31 May. Crater 3 was quiet. Based on observations of satellite imagery and information from RVO, the Darwin VAAC reported that an ash plume rose to an altitude of 3 km (10,000 ft) a.s.l. on 3 June and drifted W.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


7 March-13 March 2007

RVO reported that emission of ash clouds from Langila's Crater 2 continued during 23 February-9 March. Incandescence was visible on 24 and 25 February and 6 and 8 March. Plumes rose to less that 2.3 km (7,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE during 7-9 March.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


21 February-27 February 2007

On 13 and 14 February, eruptive activity at Langila's Crater 2 consisted of continuous emissions of gray ash plumes. During 15-23 February the emissions became forceful. Plumes rose to an altitude of 2.3 km (7,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE and SW. Occasional roaring noises were heard accompanying emissions. Incandescence was observed at the summit.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


24 January-30 January 2007

During 16-26 January, eruptive activity at Langila's Crater 2 consisted of continuous emissions of gray ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 2.3 km (7,600 ft) a.s.l. and drifted SE and NE. Fine ash fell on the flanks. Occasional roaring noises were heard accompanying emissions. Incandescence was observed at the summit.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


10 January-16 January 2007

During 1-15 January, eruptive activity at Langila's Crater 2 consisted of continuous emissions of gray ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 2.3-3.3 km (7,600-10,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted predominantly N and NE. Fine ash fell on the flanks. Occasional roaring noises were heard accompanying emissions. Incandescence was observed at the summit.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


20 December-26 December 2006

The Darwin VAAC reported that diffuse ash-and-steam plumes from Langila were visible on satellite imagery on 22 December drifting WNW.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


22 November-28 November 2006

During 21-26 November, eruptive activity at Langila's Crater 2 consisted of continuous emissions of gray ash plumes that rose to altitudes of 2.3-3.3 km (7,600-10,800 ft) a.s.l. and drifted predominantly W and NW. Fine ashfall was reported from areas downwind. Occasional roaring noises were heard accompanying emissions.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


15 November-21 November 2006

During 2-20 November, eruptive activity at Langila's Crater 2 consisted of continuous emissions of pale gray ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 2.3 km (7,500 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N, NW, and W. On 6 November, two explosions produced ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 3.8 km (12,500 ft) a.s.l. Explosions of incandescent lava fragments were visible during 2-6 November and roaring noises were heard on 2-6, 12-16, and 20 November. Incandescence from the crater was visible intermittently during the reporting period.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


1 November-7 November 2006

During 1-2 November, eruptive activity at Langila's Crater 2 consisted of continuous emissions of pale gray ash plumes that rose to an altitude of 2.3 km (7,600 ft) a.s.l. and drifted N. On 1 November the plumes were accompanied by forceful white vapor plumes, and roaring noises were heard at regular intervals. Explosions of incandescent lava fragments were also visible.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


25 October-31 October 2006

During 23-31 October, eruptive activity at Langila's Crater 2 consisted of continuous emissions of gray-to-brown ash plumes accompanied by sub-forceful gray ash plumes. Pilots reported plumes to an altitude of 2.4 km (8,000 ft) a.s.l. that drifted NE. Explosions of incandescent lava fragments were visible during 23-30 October. Based on satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 31 October a small ash plume rose to an altitude of 4.6 km (15,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted NNE.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


11 October-17 October 2006

According to the Darwin VAAC, the RVO reported that Langila erupted at 1130 on 17 October. Satellite imagery from 1133 showed no activity over Langila, but a "low level plume" was visible farther W over Ritter Island.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


9 August-15 August 2006

According to the Darwin VAAC, an ash plume from Langila was visible on satellite imagery extending NW on 9 August. Ash was not identified on subsequent imagery on 9 and 10 August.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


29 March-4 April 2006

During 16 February to 31 March, low-level Vulcanian activity continued at Langila's Crater 2. Eruptive activity was characterized by low-energy emissions of diffuse pale gray ash between 30 January and 7 February. Activity changed to subcontinuous forceful emissions of dark gray ash on 1, 2, 6, 7, and 9 March. The resultant plumes did not rise higher than 2 km above the summit crater (or 10,900 ft a.s.l.) before drifting WSW of the volcano. Weak-to-bright glow and weak projections of incandescent lava fragments were visible on 22, 23, and 28 February, and on 1, 2, and 6 March. There was no activity at Crater 3.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO) via the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center


25 January-31 January 2006

A slight increase in vulcanian activity occurred at Langila's Crater 2 during 1-15 January. The increase was characterized by nearly continuous ash emissions that rose to 1-2 km above the summit (or 7,650-10,900 ft a.s.l.) and drifted WSW. Occasionally during the report period observers noted loud noises, incandescence, and weak emissions of glowing lava fragments.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO) via the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center


23 November-29 November 2005

Vulcanian eruptions continued at Langila's Crater 2 during 21-27 November, with a slight increase in the level of activity compared to the previous week. The activity increase was marked by ash emissions that rose to heights between 1 and 2 km above the summit crater (or 7,650 and 10,900 ft a.s.l.). The ash clouds drifted W, SW, SE, and NW, depositing ash in those areas. Incandescence and projections of volcanic material were visible at the volcano during many nights. Crater 3 was quiet during the report period. Seismicity was at low-to-moderate levels, consisting of low-frequency earthquakes associated with the Vulcanian activity and periodic volcanic tremor.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO) via the Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Center


9 November-15 November 2005

During 11-12 November, low-level ash plumes emitted from Langila were visible. The heights of the plumes were not reported.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


26 October-1 November 2005

On 29 October, a plume from Langila was visible on satellite imagery at a height of ~2.7 km (9,000 ft) a.s.l.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


19 October-25 October 2005

During 20-23 October, low-level plumes from Langila were occasionally visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


21 September-27 September 2005

During 12-18 September, Langila's Crater 2 continued to forcefully erupt ash at irregular intervals. The resultant ash plumes drifted NW and W. Incandescence and weak projections of volcanic material were visible on the evening of 13 September. There was no activity at Crater 3. Seismicity was at low levels at the volcano, consisting mainly of low-frequency earthquakes.

Source: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO)


24 August-30 August 2005

RVO reported that during 22-28 August, modest eruptive activity was observed at Langila's Crater 2. Occasional forceful emissions of ash produced plumes that rose ~1 km above the crater (or 7,600 ft a.s.l.) on 22 and 25 August, but reached only several hundred meters after that. The ash plumes drifted N and NW resulting in fine ashfall in downwind areas, including the town of Kilenge. Seismicity was at low levels, consisting mainly of low-frequency earthquakes. The Darwin VAAC reported that a plume was visible on satellite imagery on 30 August extending NNW.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


17 August-23 August 2005

RVO reported that moderate levels of volcanic activity occurred at Langila's Crater 2 during 15-21 August. The activity was marked by occasional sub-continuous forceful emissions of ash. The resultant ash clouds rose as high as 1 km above the volcano (or ~7,600 ft a.s.l.) before drifting N and NW and depositing fine ash in villages along the island's coast. On the evening of the 18th, strong projections of incandescent lava fragments were seen. During the report period, there was no activity at Crater 3 and seismicity was low at the volcano. Based on a pilot report, the Darwin VAAC reported that ash from Langila was visible on 23 August at a height between 3 and 4.6 km (10,000 and 15,000 ft) a.s.l. No ash was visible on satellite imagery.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


15 June-21 June 2005

During 16-17 June, ash plumes from Langila were visible on satellite imagery. The heights of the plumes were not reported.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


8 June-14 June 2005

According to the Darwin VAAC, low-level ash plumes emitted from Langila were visible on satellite imagery during 8-13 June. RVO reported to the Darwin VAAC that fluctuating, moderate eruptive activity was expected to continue at the volcano.

The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) reported that eruptive activity occurred at Langila on 2 June with more ash than normal being emitted from the volcano. Prevailing winds carried most of the initial ashfall to the sea, but lower-level winds redirected the ash back onto the island. About 10,000 people live near the volcano and there were reports of increased cases of respiratory problems and eye irritation. During an aerial inspection of the area on 6 June, IFRC determined that ~3,490 people had been affected by the eruption, mainly in the villages of Aitavala, Masele, Kilenge, Ongaea, Potne, and Sumel, but also to a lesser extent in Vem, Galegale, Tauale, and Laut. Ashfall damaged small food gardens and contaminated some water sources. The provincial government encouraged voluntary evacuation of affected areas.

Sources: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC), International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC)


4 May-10 May 2005

Between 28 April and 4 May sub-continuous forceful emissions of thick white to gray ash-laden clouds rose about 700-800 m above the summit crater. Glow was visible during night; projections of incandescent lava became frequent during the latter part of the period. On the afternoon of 4 May the emissions changed to dark ash clouds and there were explosions with booming noises. A thin plume from the 4 May activity was seen on satellite imagery extending over 100 km NW. Very bright glow was visible during the night with moderate projections of incandescent lava fragments. Reports received by mid-day on 5th indicated the activity to be continuing. A lava flow was also produced. Light to moderate ashfall was reported to the NW at Kilenge.

Sources: Rabaul Volcano Observatory (RVO), Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


27 April-3 May 2005

Based on information from RVO, the Darwin VAAC reported that ash emissions from Langila rose to ~2.1 km (~7,000 ft) a.s.l. on 3 May. A very small plume and a hot spot were visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


15 December-21 December 2004

According to the Darwin VAAC, a plume from Langila was visible on satellite imagery on 17 December. The plume reached an unknown height and extended NW.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


10 July-16 July 2002

Based on information from a pilot report, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 11 July at about 0900 an ash cloud from Langila was observed at a height of ~3.4 km. No ash was identifiable on satellite imagery.

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2012 Nov 28 2012 Dec 5 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
2009 Sep (in or before) 2010 Feb (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
2006 Aug 9 2008 Jul 6 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2005 Apr 19 (?) 2006 Mar 31 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2004 Nov 24 (?) 2004 Dec 25 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2004 Jan 20 (?) 2004 Jan 27 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
2002 May 25 (?) 2003 Apr 9 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
1973 Feb 24 ± 4 days 2000 Oct (in or after) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Crater 3, Crater 2
1971 Jan 26 ± 5 days 1972 Jul 5 ± 4 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
1970 May 20 1970 Sep 22 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
1969 Sep 29 1969 Sep 29 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2 or 3
1967 Jan 19 1968 Jun Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2, Crater 3
1964 Dec 4 ± 4 days 1966 Sep 23 ± 3 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2, Crater 3
1962 Mar 1963 Aug 11 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2, Crater 3
1960 Dec 19 1961 Sep 25 ± 5 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 3, Crater 2
1958 Apr 21 1958 Jun 4 ± 4 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
1956 Mar 25 1956 Mar 31 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
1955 Jun 1 1955 Jun 16 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
1955 Feb 15 1955 Feb 17 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2
1954 May 18 1954 Nov 13 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Crater 2
[ 1942 ± 5 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain 1   Crater 2
1907 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NE Crater (crater 2)
1900 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations North Crater (crater 1)
1890 Unknown Confirmed 0 Historical Observations
1884 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1878 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Crater 2

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

Johnson R W, Davies R A, Palfreyman W D, 1971. Cape Gloucester Area, New Britain' volcanic geology, petrology, and eruptive history of Langila Craters up to 1970. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Rec, 1971/14: 1-34.

Mori J, McKee C, Talai B, Itikarai I, 1989. A summary of precursors to volcanic eruptions in Papua New Guinea. In: Latter J H (ed), {Volcanic Hazards - Assessment and Monitoring}, Berlin: Springer-Verlag, p 260-291.

Palfreyman W D, Wallace D A, Cooke R J S, 1981. Langila volcano: summary of reported eruptive history, and eruption periodicity from 1961 to 1972. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Mem, 10: 125-134.

Langila, one of the most active volcanoes of New Britain, consists of a group of four small overlapping composite basaltic-andesitic cones on the lower eastern flank of the extinct Talawe volcano. Talawe is the highest volcano in the Cape Gloucester area of NW New Britain. A rectangular, 2.5-km-long crater is breached widely to the SE; Langila volcano was constructed NE of the breached crater of Talawe. An extensive lava field reaches the coast on the north and NE sides of Langila. Frequent mild-to-moderate explosive eruptions, sometimes accompanied by lava flows, have been recorded since the 19th century from three active craters at the summit of Langila. The youngest and smallest crater (no. 3 crater) was formed in 1960 and has a diameter of 150 m.