Sakar

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 5.414°S
  • 148.094°E

  • 992 m
    3254 ft

  • 251080
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

16 September-22 September 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 18 September a possible diffuse ash plume from Sakar rose to an altitude of 1.8 km (6,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 165 km NW. Four hours later images showed that the volcano was clear; the plume may have been smoke from a fire or steam. RVO was unable to confirm that an eruption had or had not occurred. [Note: The Darwin VAAC later confirmed that an eruption did not occur.]

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)



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2009: September


16 September-22 September 2009

Based on analyses of satellite imagery, the Darwin VAAC reported that on 18 September a possible diffuse ash plume from Sakar rose to an altitude of 1.8 km (6,000 ft) a.s.l. and drifted 165 km NW. Four hours later images showed that the volcano was clear; the plume may have been smoke from a fire or steam. RVO was unable to confirm that an eruption had or had not occurred. [Note: The Darwin VAAC later confirmed that an eruption did not occur.]

Source: Darwin Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


There are no Holocene eruptions known for Sakar. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

Johnson R W, 1990. . (pers. comm.).

Johnson R W, Taylor G A M, Davies R A, 1972. Geology and petrology of Quaternary volcanic islands off the north coast of New Guinea. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Rec, 1972/21: 1-127.

Lowenstein P L, 1982. Problems of volcanic hazards in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 82/7: 1-62.

Silver E, Day S, Ward S, Hoffmann G, Llanes P, Driscoll N, Appelgate B, Saunders S, 2009. Volcano collapse and tsunami generation in the Bismarck Volcanic Arc, Papua New Guinea. J Volc Geotherm Res, 186: 210-222.

Sakar is an incised stratovolcano with a summit crater lake. Deep valleys cut the flanks of the volcano, which is partially surrounded by coral reefs. An older volcano that forms much of the island consists mainly of porphyritic basaltic rocks. A younger andesitic cone with a 1.5-km-wide crater has been constructed within the older volcano's larger crater, whose rim is exposed on the northern and eastern sides. No historical eruptions are known from Sakar, but warm springs are found along the SW coast, and a pyroclastic cone on the southern flank of the 8 x 10 km wide island may be of Holocene age (Johnson 1990, pers. comm.). A large submarine debris-avalanche deposit lies north of Sakar.