Bam

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 3.613°S
  • 144.818°E

  • 685 m
    2247 ft

  • 251010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Bam.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Bam.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1960 Apr 28 1960 Jul 6 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1959 Apr 2 1959 Oct 31 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1958 Sep 5 1958 Sep 10 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1958 Mar 11 ± 10 days 1958 Apr 19 (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1957 Oct 26 1957 Oct 26 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations
1954 Aug 3 1957 Jan 2 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1947 Mar 13 ± 75 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1946 Dec 1 ± 30 days ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
1944 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1941 ] [ 1942 ] Discredited    
[ 1936 Jul ] [ 1939 Apr ] Uncertain    
1924 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1920 ± 2 years ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1913 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations
1909 Apr 19 1909 Sep 13 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1908 Jul 12 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1907 Nov Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
[ 1897 ] [ 1898 ] Uncertain    
[ 1888 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1885 May 20 ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
[ 1884 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1883 Mar ] [ Unknown ] Uncertain    
1877 Nov 13 Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1874 May 20 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1872 ± 4 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
[ 1868 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1700 Apr ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    
[ 1616 ] [ Unknown ] Discredited    

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1978. Volcanoes and volcanology in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 78/2: 1-46.

Cooke R J S, Johnson R W, 1981. Bam volcano: morphology, geology, and reported eruptive history. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Mem, 10: 13-22.

Fisher N H, 1957. Melanesia. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 5: 1-105.

Hantke G, 1959. Ubersicht uber die Vulkanische Tatigkeit 1954-1956. Bull Volc, 20: 3-36.

Johnson R W, 1987. Large-scale volcanic cone collapse: the 1888 slope failure of Ritter volcano, and other examples from Papua New Guinea. Bull Volc, 49: 669-679.

Johnson R W, Taylor G A M, Davies R A, 1972. Geology and petrology of Quaternary volcanic islands off the north coast of New Guinea. Aust Bur Min Resour Geol Geophys Rec, 1972/21: 1-127.

Lowenstein P L, 1982. Problems of volcanic hazards in Papua New Guinea. Geol Surv Papua New Guinea Rpt, 82/7: 1-62.

Silver E, Day S, Ward S, Hoffmann G, Llanes P, Driscoll N, Appelgate B, Saunders S, 2009. Volcano collapse and tsunami generation in the Bismarck Volcanic Arc, Papua New Guinea. J Volc Geotherm Res, 186: 210-222.

The small 2.4 x 1.6 km island of Bam is the summit of a mostly submerged volcano that is one of the more active in Papua New Guinea. Bam is the SE-most of the Schouten Islands, and lies off the coast of New Guinea, about 40 km NNE of the mouth of the Sepik River. A steep-walled summit crater that is 300 m wide and 180 m deep is the source of Bam's recent eruptions, which have kept the upper half of the cone sparsely vegetated. A NE-trending landslide scarp extends across the upper part of the andesitic volcano from the SW coast, and a large submarine debris-avalanche deposits lies to the south and SW. The younger summit cone partially buries the eastern side of the collapse scarp. A recent lava platform on the north flank supports the small island's only villages. Historical eruptions, recorded since 1872, have been restricted to small-to-moderate explosive activity from the summit crater.