Tutuila

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.295°S
  • 170.7°W

  • 653 m
    2142 ft

  • 244020
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Tutuila.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Tutuila.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Tutuila. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Macdonald G A, 1968. A contribution to the petrology of Tutuila, American Samoa. Geol Rundschau, 57: 821-837.

Stearns H T, 1944. Geology of the Samoan Islands. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 55: 1279-1332.

Walker G P L, Eyre P R, 1995. Dike complexes in American Samoa. J Volc Geotherm Res, 69: 241-254.

The elongated, extensively eroded Tutuila Island in the center of the Samoan Islands consists of five Pliocene-to-Pleistocene volcanoes constructed along two or three rifts trending SSW-NNE. The Pago basaltic-to-andesitic shield volcano in the center of the 32-km-long island is truncated by an eroded, 9-km-wide caldera that encloses Pago Pago harbor on its west side. The caldera is now partially filled by cinder cones and trachytic lava domes. ENE-trending dike complexes are prominently exposed on Pago volcano. Following a lengthy period of erosion, submergence, and the construction of a barrier reef, the Leone volcanics were erupted during the Holocene along a 5-km-long N-S-trending fissure over a broad area at the southernmost part of the island (Stearns, 1944), forming a group of initially submarine tuff cones and subsequent subaerial cinder cones that produced fresh-looking pahoehoe lava flows.