Ta'u

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 14.23°S
  • 169.454°W

  • 931 m
    3054 ft

  • 244001
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Ta'u.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Ta'u.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Ta'u. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Stearns H T, 1944. Geology of the Samoan Islands. Geol Soc Amer Bull, 55: 1279-1332.

Stice G D, 1968. Petrology of the Manu'a Islands, Samoa. Contr Mineral Petr, 19: 343-357.

Stice G D, McCoy F W, 1968. The geology of the Manu'a Islands, Samoa. Pacific Sci, 22: 427-457.

The rectangular, 6 x 10 km Ta'u Island, located at the eastern end of the Samoan islands, is ringed by sea cliffs. The 931-m-high island is the emergent portion of the large Lata shield volcano. Collapse and landsliding of the southern portion of the basaltic shield volcano have left an arcuate, south-facing embayment with a steep headwall overlooking several flat benches. Two smaller shields were constructed along two rift zones at the NW and NE tips of the island. The NW corner of the island is extended by a tuff-cone complex that draped sea cliffs and ejected large dunite xenoliths and coral blocks. Numerous Holocene post-caldera cones occur at the summit and flanks of the Lata shield volcano.