Amsterdam Island

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.83°S
  • 77.52°E

  • 881 m
    2890 ft

  • 234001
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Amsterdam Island.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Amsterdam Island.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Amsterdam Island. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Gunn B M, Abranson E C, Nougier J, Watkins N D, Hajash A, 1971. Amsterdam Island, an isolated volcano in the southern Indian Ocean. Contr Mineral Petr, 32: 79-92.

LeMasurier W E, Thomson J W (eds), 1990. Volcanoes of the Antarctic Plate and Southern Oceans. Washington, D C: Amer Geophys Union, 487 p.

Nougier J, 1982. Volcanism of Saint Paul and Amsterdam Islands (TAAF): some aspects of volcanism along plate margins. In: Craddock C (ed) {Antarctic Geoscience}, Madison: Univ Wisconsin Press, p 755-765.

The elliptical 7 x 10 km Amsterdam Island is the northernmost subaerial volcano on the Antarctic Plate. The basaltic volcano is located near the axis of the East Indian Ocean Ridge adjacent to the Indian Plate. Amsterdam volcano was formed during two episodes of cone growth accompanied by the formation of small calderas. The caldera of the youngest eruptive center, 2 km ENE of the earlier one, contained a lava lake that fed several stages of lava outflows. Minor late-stage eruptions formed more than two dozen scoria cones and many small lava flows. No historical eruptions are known, although the fresh morphology of the latest volcanism at Dumas Crater on the NE flank suggests it may have occurred as recently as a century ago (Nougier, 1982).