Cameroon

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 4.203°N
  • 9.17°E

  • 4095 m
    13432 ft

  • 224010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

1 February-7 February 2012

A news article stated that explosions from Mount Cameroon were observed by tourists who were in the area on 3 February. The tourists reported hearing strong explosions followed by observations of "flames" and ash.

Source: Associated Press



 Available Weekly Reports


2012: February


1 February-7 February 2012

A news article stated that explosions from Mount Cameroon were observed by tourists who were in the area on 3 February. The tourists reported hearing strong explosions followed by observations of "flames" and ash.

Source: Associated Press


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2000 May 28 2000 Sep 15 ± 5 days Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Upper SW flank (4000, 3470-3220, 2750 m)
1999 Mar 28 1999 Apr 17 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations South flank (2650 and 1500 m)
1989 May 29 1989 May 29 Confirmed 1 Historical Observations NE flank (2860 m)
1982 Oct 16 1982 Nov 12 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations SW flank (2500 m)
1959 Jan 23 1959 Mar 19 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NE flank (3000-1500 m)
1954 Jun 28 1954 Jul 26 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Immediately south of summit
1925 Unknown Confirmed   Historical Observations Near Fako
1922 Feb 3 1922 Aug 24 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Mateer (W, 3300 m), Waldau (SW, 1300 m)
1909 Apr 28 1909 Jun (?) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations NE flank (2400 m; Okoli Craters)
1871 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1868 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations SW flank (2250 m) and NW flank
1866 Jan (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1865 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1852 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations West flank
1838 Dec 31 ± 365 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Near Fako
1825 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1807 ± 8 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations South flank (2600 m)
1650 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
0450 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Ateba B, Dorbath C, Dorbath L, Ntepe N, Frogneux M, Aka F T, Hell J V, 2009. Eruptive and earthquake activities related to the 2000 eruption of Mount Cameroon volcano (West Africa). J Volc Geotherm Res, 179: 206-216.

Ateba B, Ntepe N, 1997. Post-eruptive seismic activity of Mount Cameroon (Cameroon), West Africa: a statistical analysis. J Volc Geotherm Res, 79: 25-45.

Deruelle B, N'ni J, Kambou R, 1987. Mount Cameroon: an active volcano of the Cameroon Line. J African Earth Sci, 6: 197-214.

Fitton G, 1984. Mt. Cameroon, W. Africa. Volcano News, 18: 2-3.

Fitton J G, 1987. The Cameroon line, West Africa: a comparison between oceanic and continental alkaline volcanism. In: Fitton J G and Upton B G J (eds) {Alkaline Igneous Rocks}, Geol Soc Amer Spec Pub 30: 273-291.

Fitton J G, Kilburn C R J, Thirlwall M F, Hughes D J, 1983. The 1982 eruption of Mount Cameroon, West Africa. Nature, 306: 327-332.

Geze B, 1953. Les volcans du Cameroun occidental. Bull Volc, 13: 63-92.

Ngwa C N, Suh C E, Devey C W, 2010. Phreatomagmatic deposits and stratigraphic reconstruction at Debunscha Maar (Mt Cameroon volcano). J Volc Geotherm Res, 192: 201-211.

Nkoumbou C, Deruelle B, Velde D, 1995. Petrology of Mt Etinde nephelinite series. J Petr, 36: 373-395.

Richard J J, Neumann van Padang M, 1957. Africa and the Red Sea. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI 4: 1-118.

Sato H, Aramaki S, Kusakabe M, Hirabayashi J-I, Sano Y, Nojiri Y, Tchoua F, 1990. Geochemical difference of basalts between polygenetic and monogenetic volcanoes in the central part of the Cameroon volcanic line. Geochem J, 24: 357-370.

Suh C E, Luhr J F, Njome M S, 2008. Olivine-hosted glass inclusions from scoriae erupted in 1954-2000 at Mount Cameroon volcano, West Africa. J Volc Geotherm Res, 169: 1-33.

Suh C E, Sparks R S J, Fitton J G, Ayonghe S N, Annen C, Nana R, Luckman A , 2003. The 1999 and 2000 eruptions of Mount Cameroon: eruption behaviour and petrochemistry of lava. Bull Volc, 65: 267-281.

Vincent P M, 1980. Geologie et volcanologie du Mont Cameroun. Unpublished Rpt, ELF Aquitaine, 18 p.

Mount Cameroon, one of Africa's largest volcanoes, rises to 4095 m above the coast of west Cameroon. The massive steep-sided volcano of dominantly basaltic-to-trachybasaltic composition forms a volcanic horst constructed above a basement of Precambrian metamorphic rocks covered with Cretaceous to Quaternary sediments. More than 100 small cinder cones, often fissure-controlled parallel to the long axis of the massive 1400 cu km volcano, occur on the flanks and surrounding lowlands. A large satellitic peak, Etinde (also known as Little Cameroon), is located on the southern flank near the coast. Historical activity, the most frequent of west African volcanoes, was first observed in the 5th century BCE by the Carthaginian navigator Hannon. During historical time, moderate explosive and effusive eruptions have occurred from both summit and flank vents. A 1922 SW-flank eruption produced a lava flow that reached the Atlantic coast, and a lava flow from a 1999 south-flank eruption stopped only 200 m from the sea.