Suswa

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 1.175°S
  • 36.35°E

  • 2356 m
    7728 ft

  • 222110
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Suswa.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Suswa.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Suswa. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Johnson R W, 1969. Volcanic geology of Mount Suswa, Kenya. Phil Trans Roy Soc London, 265: 383-412.

McCall G J H, Bristow C M, 1965. An introductory account of Suswa volcano, Kenya. Bull Volc, 28: 333-367.

Nash W P, Carmichael I S E, Johnson R W, 1969. The mineralogy and petrology of Mount Suswa, Kenya. J Petr, 10: 409-439.

Richard J J, Neumann van Padang M, 1957. Africa and the Red Sea. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI 4: 1-118.

Skilling I P, 1993. Incremental caldera collapse of Suswa volcano, Gregory Rift Valley, Kenya. J Geol Soc London, 150: 885-896.

Williams L A J, Macdonald R, Chapman G R, 1984. Late Quaternary caldera volcanoes of the Kenya Rift Valley. J Geophys Res, 89: 8553-8570.

The southernmost caldera of the Kenya rift, Suswa contains a prominent lava cone on the south side of its 8 x 12 km caldera. Suswa lies south of Longonot volcano and about 50 km WNW of the capital city of Nairobi. Construction of an early shield volcano was followed by eruption of voluminous Pleistocene pumice flows and lava flows that accompanied incremental formation of the caldera. The 2356-m summit of the phonolitic-to-trachytic volcano is formed by the post-caldera lava cone of Ol Doinyo Onyoke ("The Red Mountain," also known as Ol Doinyo Nyukie) on the south side of the caldera. Its large elongated summit crater is truncated on the north by a ring graben. This unusual 5-km-wide circular graben at the center of the older caldera isolates a tilted island block of caldera-floor lava flows. The latest eruptions of Suswa have originated from satellitic vents that have issued still-unvegetated lava flows that may be only a century or so old.