Kone

Photo of this volcano
Google Earth icon
Google Earth Placemark
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 8.8°N
  • 39.692°E

  • 1619 m
    5310 ft

  • 221200
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Kone.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Kone.

Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1820 ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 1 Historical Observations East margin of Gariboldi caldera

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Acocella V, Korme T, Salvini F, Funiciello R, 2003. Elliptic calderas in the Ethiopian Rift: control of pre-existing structures. J Volc Geotherm Res, 119: 189-203.

Cole J W, 1969. Gariboldi volcanic complex, Ethiopia. Bull Volc, 33: 566-578.

Newhall C G, Dzurisin D, 1988. Historical unrest at large calderas of the world. U S Geol Surv Bull, 1855: 1108 p, 2 vol.

Wood C A, 1978. . (pers. comm.).

Wood C A, 1980. . (pers. comm.).

The Kone volcanic complex, also known as Gariboldi, is composed of a series of silicic calderas and young basaltic cinder cones and lava flows about 30 km SW of Fentale volcano. As many as eight silicic calderas are accompanied by ignimbrite outflow sheets. Gariboldi, the youngest caldera, is an elliptical 5 x 7.5 km wide caldera trending E-W and oriented perpendicular to the Main Ethiopian Rift. The rim of the caldera rises about 100 m above the caldera floor; the eastern rim overlaps with a smaller elliptical caldera. Roughly N-S-trending regional fissures cut across the caldera and its flanks. The youngest basalts were erupted during the first half of the 19th century from vents along a hinge line between the smaller eastern caldera and the larger western one.