Borale Ale

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 13.725°N
  • 40.6°E

  • 668 m
    2191 ft

  • 221071
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Borale Ale.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Borale Ale.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Borale Ale. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Barberi F, Varet J, 1970. The Erta Ale volcanic range (Danakill depression, Northern Afar, Ethiopia). Bull Volc, 34: 848-917.

CNR-CNRS, 1975. Geological Maps of Afar: 1, Northern Afar (1971); 2, Central and Southern Afar (1975). La Celle St Cloud, France: Geotechnip.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

WoldeGabriel G, 1987. . (pers. comm.).

Borale Ale is a complex volcano located near the center of the Erta Ale Range. The earliest activity formed submarine lava flows partially covered by Quaternary reef deposits. An embryonic shield volcano is located on the SW side of the complex and is cut by curvilinear faults; youthful chains of spatter cones follow this same curvilinear pattern and form concentric semi-circles. The 668-m-high summit of the Borale Ale complex is located on the NE side of the massif and consists of a silicic stratovolcano that is the largest of the Erte Ale Range. It has produced steep-sided viscous lava flows that have traveled up to 5 km from the volcano. Strong fumarolic activity occurs within a 300-m-wide summit crater. Regional faulting has fed very recent basaltic lava flows from a NNW-trending fissure that cuts the stratovolcano.