Alu

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 13.825°N
  • 40.508°E

  • 429 m
    1407 ft

  • 221060
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Alu.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Alu.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Alu. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Barberi F, Varet J, 1970. The Erta Ale volcanic range (Danakill depression, Northern Afar, Ethiopia). Bull Volc, 34: 848-917.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Richard J J, Neumann van Padang M, 1957. Africa and the Red Sea. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI 4: 1-118.

WoldeGabriel G, 1987. . (pers. comm.).

The summit region of Alu volcano, lying immediately NW of conical Dalaffilla volcano, is an ellipsoidal volcanic horst, elongated in a NNW-SSE direction, and formed primarily of older basaltic lava flows. Very recent fractures along the axis of the Erta Ale range cut the main volcanic horst of Alu and areas to the SSE. Major fumarolic activity is located on the numerous parallel faults, some of which have uplifts of 100 m. Fissure vents west of the horst have fed silicic lava flows, and voluminous youthful basaltic lava flows to the east extend north as far as Lake Bakili.