Gada Ale

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 13.975°N
  • 40.408°E

  • 287 m
    941 ft

  • 221050
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Gada Ale.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Gada Ale.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Gada Ale. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Barberi F, Varet J, 1970. The Erta Ale volcanic range (Danakill depression, Northern Afar, Ethiopia). Bull Volc, 34: 848-917.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Richard J J, Neumann van Padang M, 1957. Africa and the Red Sea. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI 4: 1-118.

WoldeGabriel G, 1987. . (pers. comm.).

Gada Ale, also known as Kebrit Ale, is the most prominent volcano at the northern end of the Erta Ale Range. It is formed of interstratified lava flows and hyaloclastites. Fumarolic activity is continuing, and a small lake filled by boiling mud occupies the crater. Like other Erta Ale Range volcanoes, Gada Ale is considered to be of Holocene age (Barberi and Varet, 1970). A fissure on the SE flank has produced spatter cones and a cinder cone; the latter fed lava flows that reach to Lake Bakili. The symmetrical Catherine tuff ring is located along this same SE trend west of Lake Bakili, and other tuff rings occur on the east side of the lake. A 2-km-wide salt dome west of Gada Ale has uplifted lava flows as much as 100 m, and the structure of Gada Ale itself also appears to be related to salt diapir uplift.