Jebel at Tair

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  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 15.55°N
  • 41.83°E

  • 244 m
    800 ft

  • 221010
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

28 November-4 December 2007

Since the beginning of an eruption of Jebel at Tair on 30 September, the MODIS satellite detected thermal anomalies over the island every day through 4 December. According to a news article, an eruption took place on 4 December and lava flows intermittently occurred since 30 September.

Sources: Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) Thermal Alerts Team, IRIN News



 Available Weekly Reports


2007: September | October | November


28 November-4 December 2007

Since the beginning of an eruption of Jebel at Tair on 30 September, the MODIS satellite detected thermal anomalies over the island every day through 4 December. According to a news article, an eruption took place on 4 December and lava flows intermittently occurred since 30 September.

Sources: Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) Thermal Alerts Team, IRIN News


31 October-6 November 2007

Since the beginning of an eruption of Jebel at Tair on 30 September, the MODIS satellite detected thermal anomalies over the island every day through 6 November.

Source: Hawai'i Institute of Geophysics and Planetology (HIGP) Thermal Alerts Team


3 October-9 October 2007

According to news reports, the eruption from the Jebel at Tair that began on 30 September continued on 3 October with lava flows noted on the W part of the island.

Source: Gulf News


26 September-2 October 2007

According to news reports, an eruption from the Jebel at Tair volcano was observed from several passing NATO ships on the evening of 30 September. Witnesses described a fissure eruption that produced lava fountains approximately 100 m high and ash plumes to a height of 300 m (1,000 ft) a.s.l. Multiple 1-km-long lava flows descended to the sea and a large landslide occurred on the W part of the island. Activity continued for at least two days.

The eruption prompted Yemeni authorities to evacuate about 50 soldiers from a military base on the island. A news article on 2 October reported that the Yemeni authorities lowered the death toll to three.

Two weeks prior to the eruption seismicity reportedly increased with earthquakes of M 2-3.6 recorded through 30 September.

Sources: Associated Press, Agence France-Presse (AFP), Agence France-Presse (AFP), IRIN News


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
2007 Sep 30 2008 Jun (?) Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1883 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1863 Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1833 Dec 31 ± 365 days Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1750 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Coleman R G, Fleck R J, Hedge C E, Ghent E D, 1975. The volcanic rocks of southwest Saudi Arabia and the opening of the Red Sea. DGMR (Jeddah) Bull, 22: D1-D30.

Eckhardt S, Prata A J, Seibert P, Stebel K, Stohl A, 2008. Estimation of the vertical profile of sulfur dioxide injection into the atmosphere by a volcanic eruption using satellite column measurements and inverse transport modeling. Atmos Chem Phys Discuss, 8: 3761-3805.

Gass I G, Mallick D I J, Cox K G, 1973. Volcanic islands of the Red Sea. J Geol Soc London, 129: 275-310.

Richard J J, Neumann van Padang M, 1957. Africa and the Red Sea. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI 4: 1-118.

The basaltic Jebel at Tair volcano rises from a 1200 m depth in the south-central Red Sea, forming an oval-shaped island about 3 km long. Jebel at Tair (one of many variations of the name, including Djebel Teyr, Jabal al Tayr, and Jibbel Tir ) is the northernmost known Holocene volcano in the Red Sea and lies SW of the Farisan Islands. Youthful basaltic pahoehoe lava flows from the steep-sided central vent, Jebel Duchan, cover most of the island. They drape a circular cliff cut by wave erosion of an older edifice and extend beyond it to form a flat coastal plain. Pyroclastic cones are located along the NW and southern coasts, and fumarolic activity occurs from two uneroded scoria cones at the summit. Radial fissures extend from the summit, some of which were the sources of lava flows. The island is of Holocene age, and explosive eruptions were reported in the 18th and 19th centuries.