Karapinar Field

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  • Turkey
  • Turkey
  • Cinder cone(s)
  • Unknown
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 37.67°N
  • 33.65°E

  • 1302 m
    4271 ft

  • 213001
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

There are no activity reports for Karapinar Field.



 Available Weekly Reports

There are no Weekly Reports available for Karapinar Field.

There are no Holocene eruptions known for Karapinar Field. If this volcano has had large eruptions prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Blumenthal M M, van der Kaaden G, Vlodavetz V I, 1964. Turkey & Caucasus. Catalog of Active Volcanoes of the World and Solfatara Fields, Rome: IAVCEI, 17: 1-23.

Feraud J, Ozkocak O, 1993. Les volcans actifs de Turquie: guide geologique et itineraires de'excursions. L'Assoc Volc Europeenne (LAVE), 2: 1-82.

Keller J, 1974. Quaternary maar volcanism near Karapinar in central Anatolia. Bull Volc, 38: 378-396.

Mellaart J, 1967. Catal Huyuk a Neolithic Town in Anatolia. New York: McGraw Hill, 232 p.

Toprak V, 1998. Vent distribution and its relation to regional tectonics, Cappadocian Volcanics, Turkey. J Volc Geotherm Res, 85: 55-67.

The basaltic Karapinar volcanic field is comprised of five cinder cones, two lava fields and several explosion craters and maars located on the Konya-Eregli plain SW of the Karacadag stratovolcano. The 300-m-high Meke Dagi is one of the largest cinder cones in Central Anatolia. The explosion craters and maars are located along a SW-NE line consistent with the elongation of Karacadag volcano. The maars evolved from hyaloclastite tuff rings to maars to cinder cones, reflecting varying lake water levels during the eruption.