Amiata

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  • Country
  • Volcanic Region
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 42.9°N
  • 11.63°E

  • 1738 m
    5701 ft

  • 211800
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

  • Volcano
    Number

The Global Volcanism Program has no activity reports for Amiata.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Weekly Reports available for Amiata.

The Global Volcanism Program has no Bulletin Reports available for Amiata.

Amiata is a lava dome complex located about 20 km NW of Lake Bolsena in the southern Tuscany region of Italy. The 1738-m-high trachydacitic domes and associated lava flows were erupted along regional ENE-WSW-trending faults. The largest of the domes is 1738-m-high Monte Amiata (La Vetta), the 2nd highest volcano in Italy and a compound lava dome with a trachytic lava flow that extends to the east. A massive viscous trachydacitic lava flow, 5 km long and 4 km wide, is part of the basal complex and extends from beneath the southern base of Corno de Bellaria dome. Radiometric dates indicate that the Amiata complex had a major eruptive episode about 300,000 years ago. No eruptive activity has occurred at Amiata during the Holocene, but thermal activity including cinnabar mineralization continues at a producing geothermal field near the town of Bagnore, at the SW end of the dome complex.

The Global Volcanism Program is not aware of any Holocene eruptions from Amiata. If this volcano has had large eruptions (VEI >= 4) prior to 10,000 years ago, information might be found on the Amiata page in the LaMEVE (Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions) database, a part of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).

This compilation of synonyms and subsidiary features may not be comprehensive. Features are organized into four major categories: Cones, Craters, Domes, and Thermal Features. Synonyms of features appear indented below the primary name. In some cases additional feature type, elevation, or location details are provided.



Domes
Feature Name Feature Type Elevation Latitude Longitude
Amiata, Monte
    Vetta, La
Dome 1738 m
Corno de Bellaria Dome 1614 m
Montagnola, La Dome 1571 m
Poggio Biello Dome 1303 m
Poggio della Pescina Dome 1198 m
Poggio Pinzi Dome 1155 m
Poggio Pinzi Dome 1152 m
Poggio Trauzzolo Dome 1200 m
The small Amiata lava-dome complex (just right of the center of this image), is located about 20 km NW of Lake Bolsena (left-center) in the southern Tuscany region of Italy. Viscous lava flows can be seen descending the flanks of the complex in this NASA Space Shuttle image (with north to the lower right). The largest of the domes is 1738-m-high Monte Amiata (La Vetta). No eruptive activity has occurred at Amiata during the Holocene, but thermal activity continues at a producing geothermal field.

NASA Space Station image ISS008-E-7007, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
The small Amiata lava-dome complex (just right of the center of this image), is located about 20 km NW of Lake Bolsena (left-center) in the southern Tuscany region of Italy. Viscous lava flows can be seen descending the flanks of the complex in this NASA Space Shuttle image (with north to the lower right). The largest of the domes is 1738-m-high Monte Amiata (La Vetta). No eruptive activity has occurred at Amiata during the Holocene, but thermal activity continues at a producing geothermal field.

NASA Space Station image ISS008-E-7007, 2003 (http://eol.jsc.nasa.gov/).
Monte Amiata is seen from near Radicofani, east of the volcano. The late-Pleistocene trachydacitic lava dome complex, located about 20 km NW of Lake Bolsena in the southern Tuscany region of Italy, is the 2nd highest volcano in Italy. The Amiata complex formed during two major eruptive episodes about 300,000 and 200,000 years ago. No eruptive activity has occurred at Amiata during the Holocene, but thermal activity producing cinnabar mineralization continues at a producing geothermal field near the town of Bagnore.

Photo by Anita Cadoux, 2002 (Instituto de Geofísica, UNAM, Mexico).

The following references have all been used during the compilation of data for this volcano, it is not a comprehensive bibliography. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title.

Cadoux A, Pinti D L, 2009. Hybrid character and pre-eruptive events of Mt Amiata volcano (Italy) inferred from geochronological, petro-chemical and isotopic data. J Volc Geotherm Res, 179: 169-190.

Ferrari L, Conticelli S, Burlamacchi L, Manetti P, 1996. Volcanological evolution of the Monte Amiata, southern Tuscany: new geological and petrochemical data. Acta Vulc, 8: 41-56.

IAVCEI, 1973-80. Post-Miocene Volcanoes of the World. IAVCEI Data Sheets, Rome: Internatl Assoc Volc Chemistry Earth's Interior..

Katsui Y (ed), 1971. List of the World Active Volcanoes. Volc Soc Japan draft ms, (limited circulation), 160 p.

Krafft M, 1974. Guide des Volcans d'Europe. Neuchatel: Delachaux & Niestle, 412 p.

Krafft M, Dominique de Larouziere F, 1991. Guide des Volcans d'Europe et des Canaries. Lausanne, Switzerland: Delachaux and Niestle, 455 p.

Van Bergen M J, 1985. Common trace-element characteristics of crustal- and mantle-derived K-rich magmas at Mt. Amita (Central Italy). Chem Geol, 48: 125-135.

Volcano Types

Lava dome(s)

Tectonic Setting

Subduction zone
Continental crust (> 25 km)

Affiliated Databases

Large Eruptions of Amiata Information about large Quaternary eruptions (VEI >= 4) is cataloged in the Large Magnitude Explosive Volcanic Eruptions (LaMEVE) database of the Volcano Global Risk Identification and Analysis Project (VOGRIPA).
WOVOdat WOVOdat is a database of volcanic unrest; instrumentally and visually recorded changes in seismicity, ground deformation, gas emission, and other parameters from their normal baselines. It is sponsored by the World Organization of Volcano Observatories (WOVO) and presently hosted at the Earth Observatory of Singapore.
EarthChem EarthChem develops and maintains databases, software, and services that support the preservation, discovery, access and analysis of geochemical data, and facilitate their integration with the broad array of other available earth science parameters. EarthChem is operated by a joint team of disciplinary scientists, data scientists, data managers and information technology developers who are part of the NSF-funded data facility Integrated Earth Data Applications (IEDA). IEDA is a collaborative effort of EarthChem and the Marine Geoscience Data System (MGDS).
Smithsonian Collections Search the Smithsonian's NMNH Department of Mineral Sciences collections database. Go to the "Search Rocks and Ores" tab and use the Volcano Name drop-down to find samples.