Stromboli

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  • Italy
  • Italy
  • Stratovolcano
  • 2013 CE
  • Country
  • Subregion Name
  • Primary Volcano Type
  • Last Known Eruption
  • 38.789°N
  • 15.213°E

  • 924 m
    3031 ft

  • 211040
  • Latitude
  • Longitude

  • Summit
    Elevation

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27 February-5 March 2013

Stromboli again produced small lava overflows from the crater terrace on the afternoon of 27 February through the following night, after an interval of 10 days of normal Strombolian activity. A second episode of lava overflow started on the evening of 1 March and ceased the next afternoon. Both overflows were fed by continuous spattering from vent N2, which lies at the top of a hornito perched on the N rim of the crater terrace.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)



 Available Weekly Reports


2013: January | February
2012: November
2011: February | July | August
2010: March | July | December
2007: February | March | November
2005: October
2004: March
2003: February | March | April | June | July | August | November | December
2002: January | July | November | December
2001: October


27 February-5 March 2013

Stromboli again produced small lava overflows from the crater terrace on the afternoon of 27 February through the following night, after an interval of 10 days of normal Strombolian activity. A second episode of lava overflow started on the evening of 1 March and ceased the next afternoon. Both overflows were fed by continuous spattering from vent N2, which lies at the top of a hornito perched on the N rim of the crater terrace.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


13 February-19 February 2013

Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that a new phase of intermittent effusive activity at Stromboli, which consisted of small overflows of lava from the crater terrace, began on 8 February and continued until the morning of 17 February. During this interval several episodes of effusive activity occurred in the N and NW sectors of the Sciara del Fuoco, producing lava flows that traveled several tens to a few hundred meters.

Lava overflows ceased on the afternoon of 10 February, but effusive activity resumed in the early morning hours of the next day. On the afternoon of 11 February, three small lava flows were visible on the upper slope of the Sciara del Fuoco; the westernmost flow traveled a few hundred meters. That evening two of these flows remained active and continued to be fed until the morning of 12 February. The more westerly of the flows then stopped, whereas the flow traveling N continued until the early afternoon.

After an interval of non-visibility due to inclement weather conditions, a new lava flow traveled NW in the evening of 12 February. This flow progressively diminished, but was still active at about 1100 on 13 February.

The vent N2, perched on the NW rim of the crater terrace, produced continuous spattering, which also fed a small lava flow parallel to the already active flow. Spattering continued for a few hours, and then diminished during the late afternoon of 14 February. Subsequently, effusive activity diminished considerably, and only very small lava overflows extended a few tens of meters NW. In the morning of 17 February, all effusive activity ceased and mild Strombolian activity resumed.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


6 February-12 February 2013

On 9 February Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that after about three weeks of normal explosive activity, new, small lava overflows again occurred on Stromboli's crater terrace. The first overflow started in the morning of 8 February, producing a small lava flow that descended the upper NW slope of the Sciara del Fuoco, and ceased during the afternoon. The second overflow began shortly after midnight on 9 February and produced a lava flow that traveled N. Bad weather prevented surveillance video transmission after 0125; when the transmission resumed at 1000, the feeding of the lava flow had diminished, and the active flow front was retreating upslope, generating frequent rockfalls. In the late afternoon of 9 February lava effusion ceased altogether, but resumed once more during the early morning hours of 10 February, generating a small flow that slowly advanced downslope for a few tens of meters. The lava front continuously produced incandescent rockfalls. During the day, lava emission progressively diminished, and ceased completely in the late afternoon.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


23 January-29 January 2013

On 15 January Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that overflowing lava from vents lying just below the rim of the northernmost explosive vent on Stromboli's crater terrace generated small lava flows that traveled down the N and NW sectors of the Sciara del Fuoco. Landslides caused by the sliding and rolling of loose rock material on the steep slope of the Sciara del Fuoco sometimes accompanied the lava flows. At night during 15-16 January, effusive activity ceased, then only very small lava overflows were observed on the evening of 17 January and during the night of 19-20 January.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


9 January-15 January 2013

On 10 January Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that since the morning of 23 December 2012 overflowing lava from vents lying just below the rim of the northernmost explosive vent on Stromboli's crater terrace generated small lava flows that traveled down the N and NW sectors of the Sciara del Fuoco. In addition, the rapid accumulation of spatter during intense explosive activity often generated small flows that were accompanied by numerous landslides. Major lava flows occurred on 23 December (traveling N), during 25-27 December (traveling NW), and on 7 January (traveling NW).

During the intervals between the main effusive episodes, lava was extruded at extremely low rates from the vents, resulting numerous incandescent blocks descending the Sciara del Fuoco. Sometimes small lava flows advanced for a few tens of meters before disintegrating into blocks, such as on the morning of 10 January 2013. In all cases, the effusion of lava was preceded, and often accompanied, by intense explosive activity on the crater terrace.

A report on 15 January noted that intermittent emissions of small lava flows from the crater terrace continued, sometimes accompanied by landslides caused by the sliding and rolling of loose rock material on the steep slope of the Sciara del Fuoco.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


21 November-27 November 2012

Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that the persistent explosive activity at Stromboli showed a clear increase on 21 November with episodes of spattering and low lava fountaining from two vents located in the N and central portions of the crater terrace.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


3 August-9 August 2011

Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that during the morning of 9 August a new episode of weak spattering occurred on Stromboli's crater terrace, generating a small intra-crater lava flow. The source vent was located in the central portion of the crater terrace. Regular explosive activity also continued from the vents located in the N and S parts of the crater terrace. Spattering continued into the afternoon, then ceased.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


27 July-2 August 2011

Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that during the late evening of 1 August a vast accumulation of incandescent material appeared at the base of Stromboli's N1 vent, the northernmost active vent within the crater terrace at about 750 m elevation. Within a few minutes, the material collapsed and slid downslope, creating two small lobes of lava. The more easterly flow descended the N slope of the Sciara del Fuoco, generating small landslides from the loose material on the slope, and marking the first lava effusion event outside of the crater since a small emission during 11-12 December 2010. The lava accumulated on a flat area near hornitos that were formed during 2002-2003, before continuing further down a steep slope. On 2 August the lava had descended to 500 m elevation and advanced very slowly. During the afternoon effusion appeared to have diminished.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


6 July-12 July 2011

Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo reported that on 5 July a high pyroclastic jet formed in the S part of Stromboli's crater terrace producing tephra that fell back onto the Pizzo sopra la Fossa. Seismic data indicated that other craters on the terrace were also active. A similar but less powerful explosion occurred from the same vent on 10 July.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


16 February-22 February 2011

INGV-CT reported that on 17 February a series of strong explosions from the northernmost vent of Stromboli's summit area led to the accumulation of hot scoriaceous material on the external N flank of the crater. Activity continued at elevated levels from two vents in the northern portion of the crater terrace through 23 February.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


29 December-4 January 2011

INGV-CT reported that on 19 December a major explosion from a vent in the southern part of Stromboli's crater terrace occurred at 0956, coincident with explosive sequence consisting of three discrete seismic events. During the last few days of December the "S1" vent produced frequent explosions of greater intensity than those of the preceding days. Jets rose 200 m above the crater terrace. On 27 December, the frequency of the explosions rose to 11-14 per hour. The "S1" vent is immediately next to the "S" vent, the source of the 19 December explosion.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


22 December-28 December 2010

INGV-CT reported that a sequence of three explosions from Stromboli's "S" vent in the S part of the crater terrace were recorded on 19 December by thermal monitoring cameras in Vancori and Pizzo. The first explosion ejected coarse-grained pyroclastic material, followed by fine-grained tephra, more than 250 m above the crater terrace. A slightly less intense explosion occurred less than a minute later. The third and weakest explosion ejected material 180-200 m above the crater, generating an ash plume that dispersed over the W and NE parts of the island.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


7 July-13 July 2010

INGV-CT reported that two major explosions from Stromboli were detected by the seismic network. These explosions occurred from the SW crater area on 25 June and from the NE crater area on 30 June. Poor weather conditions prevented visual observations using the web camera monitoring system. The event on 30 June was stronger, with several explosions occurring in a short time. Fallout from incandescent blocks triggered vegetation fires.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


10 March-16 March 2010

INGV-CT reported strong explosions from Stromboli on 10 March mainly from craters located in the N part of the crater terrace, a flat area in the upper part of Sciara del Fuoco (a depression cutting the NW flank of the volcano). After one of the more powerful explosions, lava flowed over the NW edge of the crater terrace for tens of meters before fragmenting and producing small landslides of hot material that likely reached the sea.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


7 November-13 November 2007

Observers reported that on 5 November five active vents at Stromboli were visible at the bottom of the crater terrace, which subsided about 100 m since March 2007. Lava fountains from a vent in the SW crater were sustained for over one minute and spattering was observed from two vents in the central crater. The vents erupted about every five to ten minutes to one hour.

Source: Stromboli On-Line


14 March-20 March 2007

INGV-CT reported that the eruption at Stromboli that started on 27 February continued during 15 March. On 9 March, the vent at 400 m elevation that fed the lava flows closed and another vent opened on the N flank of the NE Crater at 550 m elevation. It remained active for less than 24 hours. After it closed, the 400-m vent re-opened and lava again flowed to the sea. On 15 March, a major explosion occurred during an effusive flank eruption.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


28 February-6 March 2007

INGV-CT reported that the eruption at Stromboli that started on 27 February continued during 7 March. Lava from a fissure on the NE flank of Crater 1 (the NE crater) flowed down the Sciara del Fuoco and formed two branches that reached the sea, resulting in steam plumes and a modified coastline. Explosive activity from the summit craters ceased when the lava flowed from the fissure, but gas puffing accompanied by small landslides inside the craters started again after 3 March.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


21 February-27 February 2007

Based on news reports, lava from Stromboli was observed flowing from two craters near the summit on 27 February. One lava flow traveled down the flanks more than 900 m and reached the sea. Several explosions per hour were audible.

Sources: Deutsche Presse-Agentur, United Press International


12 October-18 October 2005

A plume emitted from Stromboli that may have contained ash was visible on satellite imagery on 14 October at a height around 1.8-2.4 km (6,000-8,000 ft) a.s.l. The plume extended ~10 km NW of the volcano.

Source: Toulouse Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


10 March-16 March 2004

INGV-CT reported that explosive activity at Stromboli's three summit craters increased after 10 February, leading to significant growth of the cinder cones inside the craters. Several powerful explosions, especially from Crater 1 (the NE crater) and Crater 3 (the SW crater), sent scoriae 200 m above the craters. These powerful explosions led to fallout of fresh bombs and lapilli on Il Pizzo Sopra la Fossa (an area atop the volcano about 100 m above the crater terrace) in early March. As of 8 March, Strombolian activity was occurring at the volcano, with variations in the number and frequency of explosions within normally observed limits, and the intensity of explosions at the higher limit of commonly observed activity.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


10 December-16 December 2003

The Stromboli Web video camera showed a small explosion on 10 December that produced a plume to a height of ~1 km above the volcano. No ash was visible on satellite imagery.

Source: Toulouse Volcanic Ash Advisory Centre (VAAC)


5 November-11 November 2003

According to aviation reports from the U.S. Air Force, the web camera at Stromboli captured light ash emissions on 7 and 11 November. In both cases plumes rose to ~2.5 km a.s.l.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


20 August-26 August 2003

INGV-CT reported that after the effusive eruption at Stromboli ceased between 21 and 22 July, explosive Strombolian activity became more common at both summit craters. Four active vents were observed within Crater 1 (the NE crater), and one funnel-shaped incandescent depression was seen within Crater 3 (the SW crater). Strombolian activity during the first half of August was very intense at Crater 1, with spattering that led to the creation of a spatter cone on the crater floor and fallout of incandescent bombs on the cone's outer flanks. Explosive activity at Crater 3 appeared to be deeper than at Crater 1 and was often accompanied by ash emission. During the first half of August thermal images of the apparently inactive flow field revealed a thermal signature within cracks on the upper flow field and within skylights along two lava tubes in the upper Sciara del Fuoco, at about 550 m elevation. Temperatures over 300°C and incandescence at these hot spots suggest endogenous growth of the apparently inactive lava flow field. Incandescence and thermal signatures at these sites were not seen between 22 and 31 July.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


23 July-29 July 2003

According to INGV-CT, the eruption that began at Stromboli on 28 December 2002 ended on 22 July. Strombolian activity occurred almost continuously in July, with spatter often falling outside the rim of Crater 1 (the NE crater). Mainly degassing and sporadic ash emissions occurred at Crater 3 (the SW crater), with Strombolian explosions becoming more common during the second half of July. Erosion of the N flank of Crater 1 by landslides in the upper Sciara del Fuoco increased in July, with the 30 December 2002 landslide scar extending backward and upslope, cutting the flank of the cone just 50 m below the crater rim. Lava effusion from vents located at about 600 m elevation on the upper eastern corner of the Sciara del Fuoco decreased beginning in early June, completely stopping between 21 and 22 July.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


11 June-17 June 2003

INGV-CT reported that the effusive eruption that began at Stromboli on 15 February on the upper eastern corner of the Sciara del Fuoco (a horseshoe-shaped scarp) continued until at least 16 June, with a general decrease in lava-effusion rate. During 1-6 June, there was Strombolian activity at Crater 1 (the NE crater). Most ejecta fell within the crater and pulsating dark ash was emitted. On 11 June lava flows were occasionally emitted from hornitos at 600-m elevation. Discontinuous ash emission occurred from the summit crater until mid-June. On 15 June a SAR fixed camera recorded a Strombolian explosion, with abundant ash emissions.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


9 April-15 April 2003

INGV-CT reported that the effusive eruption at Stromboli, which started on 28 December 2002, continued through 8 April 2003 from vents at 600 m a.s.l. On 5 April scientists from INGV-CT observing the volcano from a helicopter saw lava flowing from three vents at 600 m and a diluted gas plume emanating from the summit craters. A few minutes after the survey began the gas plume suddenly became red and soon after juvenile, darker material was emitted from Crater 1 (the NE crater). A hot, cauliflower-shaped jet rapidly grew above the crater. Around 2-3 seconds later Crater 3 (the SW crater) emitted a hot jet of juvenile material and soon after the two jets joined together. Then a very powerful explosion occurred at 0912 that pushed the helicopter away from the crater. A mushroom-shaped dark cloud rose to ~1 km above Stromboli's summit. The base of the cloud was surrounded by a dark gray cloud similar to a base surge. Bombs, blocks, and ash fell on the volcano's NE flank above 400 m elevation, burning vegetation. Most ejecta drifted W, falling on the town of Ginostra, about 1.5 km away, and destroyed two houses.

Observations after the eruption revealed that the lava-flow field on the upper Sciara del Fuoco (a horseshoe-shaped scarp) at 600 m elevation was completely covered by a carpet of brown debris ejected from Crater 1 during the initial phase of the event. A thick steam cloud rose above the debris carpet, formed by vaporization of wet debris above the hot lava flows. Alternating pulses of black and red ash emissions rose mainly above Crater 3. The upper part of the volcano (above 700 m elevation) was completely covered by a continuous carpet of pyroclastic products. Within a few minutes after the eruption, lava flows were active again on the Sciara del Fuoco at 600 m elevation, emerging through the debris carpet. On 8 April INGV-CT scientists saw lava flowing from four vents on the Sciara del Fuoco. Two flows traveled in the middle of the scarp and blocks detaching from the lava-flow fronts generated small rockfalls that reached the sea. News about the eruption (in Italian) and photos are available on the INGV-CT website.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


2 April-8 April 2003

A strong explosion at Stromboli on 5 April around 0915 produced a mushroom-shaped ash cloud that rose several hundred meters above the volcano. Rocks ejected during the explosion damaged two homes and several roads in the town of Ginostra ~ 2 km SW of Stromboli's summit. There were no reports of injuries.

Sources: Stromboli On-Line, Associated Press, Agence France-Presse (AFP)


12 March-18 March 2003

INGV-CT reported that the eruption at Stromboli, which started on 28 December 2002, continued through 12 March. In early March two major lava flows spread NE and NW from the base of the NE crater. Hot aa lava blocks detached from lava-flow fronts causing several minor rockfalls and landslides along the Sciara del Fuoco. Lava entering the sea formed steam clouds. A decrease in lava-effusion rate from the 600-m-vent on 6 March led to a regression of the most advanced flow front to 300- to 400-m-elevation, and a smaller number of active ephemeral vents along the lava-flow field. Occasionally during 5-10 March, brown-to-pink ash emissions occurred at Crater 3 (the SW crater) that were probably produced from inner-crater collapses. No explosive activity has been observed at the summit craters since the start of the flank eruption. Detailed daily reports of volcanic activity (in Italian) are available at the INGV-CT website.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


19 February-25 February 2003

INGV-CT reported that the effusive eruption that began at Stromboli on 28 December 2002, continued through 25 February 2003. Between 30 December 2002 and 15 February 2003 lava flowed from a main vent located at ~500 m elevation in the middle of the Sciara del Fuoco (a horseshoe-shaped scarp), within the scar left by the 30 December 2002 landslide. Another vent, located at ~600 m elevation at the NE base of Crater 1 (NE crater), had been active several times during the eruption, forming slow, short flows that lasted a few hours to a few days. On 15 February, after a gradual decrease in effusion rate, the vent at ~500 m elevation became inactive. This was accompanied by the opening of a new vent at ~600 m elevation, which emitted small lava flows on the upper Sciara del Fuoco. A small, complex flow field was formed with several lava tubes and ephemeral vents. This was the first time since the start of the eruption that activity at the ~500-m-elevation vent completely ceased, and the first time that the ~600-m-elevation vent remained active for over 10 days. Detailed daily reports of volcanic activity (in Italian) are available at the INGV-CT website.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


5 February-11 February 2003

INGV-CT reported that the effusive eruption that began at Stromboli on 28 December 2002, continued through 6 February 2003. Emission of lava occurred from a main vent located at 500 m elevation in the middle of the Sciara de Fuocco (a horseshoe-shaped scarp), within the scar left by the 30 December 2002 landslide. Another vent, located at 600 m elevation at the NE base of Crater 1, was active several times during the eruption. Slow, short lava flows were emitted from this vent for periods lasting a few hours to a few days. During peaks in effusion rate, aa lava flows reached the sea, causing phreatic explosions at the lava-flow front.

During a thermal survey from a helicopter on 12 January, arcuate cracks were seen around the S base of the volcano's summit craters. Other fractures, oriented NE-SW, cut through the craters. Collapse of the crater's bottom during early January significantly changed the morphology of the upper part of the volcano. Previously there had been three individual craters, but scientists saw that Crater 1 (NE) and 3 (SW) had joined together to form one elongate depression. Crater 2 (the middle crater) no longer existed. INGV-CT noted that no explosive activity had occurred at the summit craters since the start of the activity within the Sciara del Fuocco. News about the eruption (in Italian), thermal images, photos, and videos of the 30 December 2002 collapse event can be downloaded from the INGV-CT website.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


31 December-6 January 2003

INGV-CT reported that an effusive eruption began at Stromboli's summit at the base of the NE crater (Crater 1) on 28 December and ended the following day. A survey performed on 29 December, with a thermal camera on a Civil Protection helicopter, revealed that three lava flows had spread in the eastern Sciara del Fuoco (a horseshoe-shaped scarp). The lava flows reached the sea within 30 minutes, and spanned a width of 300 m along the coast.

On 30 December at 1315 and 1322 two landslides suddenly formed along the Sciara del Fuoco. As they traveled down the volcano's flank they produced wet, fine ashfall (less than 0.1 mm in size) on the island's SE side. The first landslide had a volume of about 600,000 m3, the second about 5,000,000 m3, and they both reached the sea. Upon contact with the sea the landslides produced two tsunamis with waves that were several meters high. The tsunamis injured few people, and damaged buildings and boats in the villages of Stromboli and Ginostra. Large waves were reported as far away as the town of Milazzo, on Sicily's N coast, 60 km S of Stromboli.

INGV-CT noted that no explosive activity occurred after the start of the 28 December effusive eruption at Stromboli. In addition, no earthquakes were recorded by their seismic network except for two that were associated with the landslides. On 1 January, a thin lava flow was expanding along the Sciara del Fuoco. As of 6 January effusive activity was ongoing at Stromboli. Lava was being emitted from two vents located at 500 m and 300 m elevation in the middle of the Sciara del Fuoco. The two narrow lava flows merged together before reaching the sea. Occasional small landslides occurred from the unstable walls of the Sciara del Fuoco, covering the lava flows with thin talus. News about the eruption at Stromboli, thermal images of the 28 December flow, and photos and video of the collapse event are available on the INGV-CT website.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


24 December-30 December 2002

According to an INGV-CT report, "At 1830 of 28 December a new effusive eruption started at Stromboli volcano... Strombolian activity at Stromboli was very intense since May 2002, and lava level within the craters was very high on 19 November, when a survey using a thermal camera from [a] helicopter has been carried out. In November, an overflow from the N rim of Crater 2 formed a small lava flow a few tens of meters long, which spread in the upper Sciara del Fuoco. This event has been accompanied by a greater frequency of explosion-quakes associated to the explosions. Between 7 and 10 December explosive activity from the summit craters decreased. On 11 December Strombolian activity increased again as [reflected in the] frequency of the explosions and heights of ejecta, and was particularly intense at Crater 1, the NE crater. On 28 December the height of ejecta reached 200 m above Crater 1, and the shape of explosions suggested magma very close to the crater rim. This activity climaxed at 1830 with a strong explosion that caused ash fallout on the village of Stromboli, accompanied by the opening of an eruptive fissure trending NE-SW. The fissure opened at the NE base of Crater 1. A lava flow came out from the base of the fissure, and formed three lava branches spreading within the Sciara del Fuoco. Within 30 minutes the flows reached the sea, about 1 km away, far away from the villages. The lava flows were up to 300 m wide at the shoreline, and very narrow along the steep slope of Sciara del Fuoco. A small increase in the volcanic tremor accompanied the lava flow emission, and the number of seismic events associated to the eruptive activity is still of about five shocks per hour."

"A thermal survey carried out from [a] helicopter on 29 December did not allow us to see the craters because of poor weather conditions. A thick cloud was covering the summit of the volcano above 600 m a.s.l. The lava flows below this elevation were cooling and did not show any movement, suggesting the end of the effusive phase. A map of the lava flows, today's photos of Stromboli and updated reports (in Italian) are visible on the INGV-CT web page."

According to several news articles, volcanic activity at Stromboli on 30 December caused a landslide, which entered the sea and generated a tsunami. The articles stated that in the small village of Ginostra, waves injured six people, and damaged homes and boats. Residents and tourists were evacuated to nearby Sicily.

Sources: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV), ABC News - Australian Broadcasting Corporation, BBC News, Reuters, CNN


6 November-12 November 2002

During the end of October, there was an increase in the intensity of Strombolian activity at Stromboli. More powerful eruptions and a larger number of ash-dominated eruptions occurred than is usual.

Source: Stromboli On-Line


24 July-30 July 2002

During 5-24 July, the level of volcanic activity fluctuated at Stromboli. Small explosions occasionally occurred at Northeast Crater, while fewer occurred at Southwest Crater. The central crater was inactive. On 24 July at about 0745 a relatively large explosion produced a mushroom-shaped plume to a height of ~0.5 km above the summit. It was not known from which crater the explosion occurred.

Sources: Italy's Volcanoes, Stromboli On-Line


23 January-29 January 2002

On 23 January at 2054 a large explosion occurred at Stromboli. The explosion was accompanied by a loud noise that was heard at all of the villages on the island and ashfall that lasted for several minutes. During a visit to the summit area on 24 January, INGV-CT staff found the area SE of the summit craters near Il Pizzo Sopra la Fossa between the Bastimento and La Fossetta was covered with ash and blocks. Most of the fallout was comprised of lithic material up to 60 cm in diameter, with minor amounts of spatter up to 1.7 m long. Fine-grained material covered the crater zone and the volcano's NE flank to the village of Stromboli, ~2 km to the NE. A continuous carpet of fallout material covered the zone of Il Pizzo, a spot where many tourists visit.

Weak volcanic activity was observed during the survey; only five weak explosions occurred from Crater 1 in 2.5 hours, with none at Craters 2 and 3. Thermal imagery showed that Crater 2 was hotter than the other active craters; the high temperatures were due to spatter coating the crater's inner walls. Measurements revealed that the diameter of Crater 2 had grown from an estimated 10 m in October 2001 to about 26 m after the 23 January explosion.

Source: Sezione di Catania - Osservatorio Etneo (INGV)


17 October-23 October 2001

On 20 October at 0235 an eruption began at Stromboli. Preliminary reports stated that glowing rocks were observed being ejected from the volcano. A tourist was killed after being struck by ejecta from the eruption. Two areas of burning vegetation approximately 200 m apart were observed at 600 m elevation. Hot ejecta may have landed in these areas.

Sources: Stromboli On-Line, New York Times


Summary of eruption dates and Volcanic Explosivity Indices (VEI).

Start Date Stop Date Eruption Certainty VEI Evidence Activity Area or Unit
1934 Feb 2 2013 Aug 16 (continuing) Confirmed 2 Historical Observations Summit craters and Sciara del Fuoco
1932 Jun 3 1932 Jun 3 Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
1910 May 1931 Jul Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Summit craters and Sciara del Fuoco
1890 1907 May 29 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
1857 1889 Jun 26 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Summit craters and Sciara del Fuoco
1558 (in or before) 1857 Confirmed 3 Historical Observations Summit craters and Sciara del Fuoco
0950 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0550 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 3 Historical Observations
0250 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0150 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0050 ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0050 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0210 BCE ± 10 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
0350 BCE ± 50 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Historical Observations
4050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 3 Radiocarbon (uncorrected) Secche di Lazzaro pyroclastics
4250 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 2 Magnetism NE flank (Punta Lena lava flow)
4550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism Northern flank (Vallonazzo)
4800 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 2 Magnetism Northern flank
5050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism Northern flank (Vallonazzo lava flow)
5550 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism Northern flank (Labronzo)
5800 BCE ± 300 years Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism NE flank (Nel Camnestrà lava flow)
6050 BCE (?) Unknown Confirmed 0 Magnetism Northern flank (Vallonazzo)

The following references are the sources used for data regarding this volcano. References are linked directly to our volcano data file. Discussion of another volcano or eruption (sometimes far from the one that is the subject of the manuscript) may produce a citation that is not at all apparent from the title. Additional discussion of data sources can be found under Volcano Data Criteria.

Andronico D, Pistolesi M, 2010. The November 2009 paroxysmal explosions at Stromboli. J Volc Geotherm Res, 196: 120-125.

Arrighi S, Rosi M, Tanguy J-C, Courtillot V, 2004. Recent eruptive history of Stromboli (Aeolian Islands, Italy) determined from high-accuracy archeomagnetic dating. Geophys Res Lett, 35: L19603, doi:10.1029/2004GL020627.

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Spectacular incandescent nighttime explosions at Stromboli volcano have long attracted visitors to the "Lighthouse of the Mediterranean." Stromboli, the NE-most of the Aeolian Islands, has lent its name to the frequent mild explosive activity that has characterized its eruptions throughout much of historical time. The small, 924-m-high island of Stromboli is the emergent summit of a volcano that grew in two main eruptive cycles, the last of which formed the western portion of the island. The Neostromboli eruptive period from about 13,000 to 5000 years ago was followed by formation of the modern Stromboli edifice. The active summit vents are located at the head of the Sciara del Fuoco, a prominent horseshoe-shaped scarp formed about 5000 years ago as a result of the most recent of a series of slope failures that extend to below sea level. The modern volcano has been constructed within this scarp, which funnels pyroclastic ejecta and lava flows to the NW. Essentially continuous mild strombolian explosions, sometimes accompanied by lava flows, have been recorded at Stromboli for more than a millennium.